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Article: Ectoplasmic specialization, a testis-specific cell-cell actin-based adherens junction type: Is this a potential target for male contraceptive development?

TitleEctoplasmic specialization, a testis-specific cell-cell actin-based adherens junction type: Is this a potential target for male contraceptive development?
Authors
Keywords1-(2,4-dichlorobenzyl)-indazole-3-carbohydrazide
Ectoplasmic specialization
Male contraception
Sertoli-germ cell AJ dynamics
Testis
Issue Date2004
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://humupd.oxfordjournals.org
Citation
Human Reproduction Update, 2004, v. 10 n. 4, p. 349-369 How to Cite?
AbstractThe seminiferous tubule of the mammalian testis is largely composed of Sertoli and germ cells, which coordinate with Leydig cells in the interstitium and perform two major physiological functions, namely spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis respectively. Each tubule is morphologically divided into (i) the seminiferous epithelium composing Sertoli and germ cells, and (ii) the basement membrane (a modified form of extracellular matrix); underneath this lies the collagen fibril network, the myoid cell layer, and the lymphatic vessel, which collectively constitute the tunica propia. In the seminiferous epithelium, of rodent testes each type A1 spermatogonium (diploid, 2n) differentiates into 256 elongated spermatids (haploid, 1n) during spermatogenesis. Additionally, developing germ cells must migrate progressively from the basal to the luminal edge of the adluminal compartment so that fully developed spermatids can be released into the lumen at spermiation. Without this timely event of cell movement, spermatogenesis cannot reach completion and infertility will result. Yet developing round elongating/elongated spermatids must remain attached to the epithelium via a specialized Sertoli-germ cell actin-based adherens junction (AJ) type known as ectoplasmic specialization (ES), which is crucial not only for cell attachment but also for spermatid movement and orientation in the epithelium. However, the biochemical composition and molecular architecture of the protein complexes that constitute the ES have only recently been studied. Furthermore, the signalling pathways that regulate ES dynamics are virtually unknown. This review highlights recent advances in these two areas of research. It is expected that, if adequately expanded, these studies should yield new insights into the development of novel contraceptives targeted to perturb ES function in the testis. The potential to specifically target the ES may also mean that contraceptive action could be achieved without perturbing the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis. © European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology 2004; all rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143478
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 11.194
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.678
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, NPYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, CYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-02T05:22:10Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-02T05:22:10Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHuman Reproduction Update, 2004, v. 10 n. 4, p. 349-369en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1355-4786en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143478-
dc.description.abstractThe seminiferous tubule of the mammalian testis is largely composed of Sertoli and germ cells, which coordinate with Leydig cells in the interstitium and perform two major physiological functions, namely spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis respectively. Each tubule is morphologically divided into (i) the seminiferous epithelium composing Sertoli and germ cells, and (ii) the basement membrane (a modified form of extracellular matrix); underneath this lies the collagen fibril network, the myoid cell layer, and the lymphatic vessel, which collectively constitute the tunica propia. In the seminiferous epithelium, of rodent testes each type A1 spermatogonium (diploid, 2n) differentiates into 256 elongated spermatids (haploid, 1n) during spermatogenesis. Additionally, developing germ cells must migrate progressively from the basal to the luminal edge of the adluminal compartment so that fully developed spermatids can be released into the lumen at spermiation. Without this timely event of cell movement, spermatogenesis cannot reach completion and infertility will result. Yet developing round elongating/elongated spermatids must remain attached to the epithelium via a specialized Sertoli-germ cell actin-based adherens junction (AJ) type known as ectoplasmic specialization (ES), which is crucial not only for cell attachment but also for spermatid movement and orientation in the epithelium. However, the biochemical composition and molecular architecture of the protein complexes that constitute the ES have only recently been studied. Furthermore, the signalling pathways that regulate ES dynamics are virtually unknown. This review highlights recent advances in these two areas of research. It is expected that, if adequately expanded, these studies should yield new insights into the development of novel contraceptives targeted to perturb ES function in the testis. The potential to specifically target the ES may also mean that contraceptive action could be achieved without perturbing the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis. © European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology 2004; all rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://humupd.oxfordjournals.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHuman Reproduction Updateen_HK
dc.subject1-(2,4-dichlorobenzyl)-indazole-3-carbohydrazideen_HK
dc.subjectEctoplasmic specializationen_HK
dc.subjectMale contraceptionen_HK
dc.subjectSertoli-germ cell AJ dynamicsen_HK
dc.subjectTestisen_HK
dc.subject.meshActinsen_US
dc.subject.meshAdherens Junctionsen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshCell Communicationen_US
dc.subject.meshCell Movementen_US
dc.subject.meshContraceptive Agents - Maleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshHydrazinesen_US
dc.subject.meshIndazolesen_US
dc.subject.meshIntracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteinsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMuscle Proteinsen_US
dc.subject.meshRatsen_US
dc.subject.meshSeminiferous Epitheliumen_US
dc.subject.meshSpermatogenesisen_US
dc.titleEctoplasmic specialization, a testis-specific cell-cell actin-based adherens junction type: Is this a potential target for male contraceptive development?en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, NPY: nikkilee@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, NPY=rp00263en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/humupd/dmh026en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15192055-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-3242811705en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-3242811705&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume10en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage349en_HK
dc.identifier.epage369en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000222271700007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, NPY=7402722690en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, CY=7404797787en_HK

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