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Article: Gaze training enhances laparoscopic technical skill acquisition and multi-tasking performance: A randomized, controlled study

TitleGaze training enhances laparoscopic technical skill acquisition and multi-tasking performance: A randomized, controlled study
Authors
KeywordsDistractions
Eye-hand coordination
Gaze strategy
Implicit motor learning
Psychomotor control
Stress
Issue Date2011
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00464/
Citation
Surgical Endoscopy And Other Interventional Techniques, 2011, v. 25 n. 12, p. 3731-3739 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The operating room environment is replete with stressors and distractions that increase the attention demands of what are already complex psychomotor procedures. Contemporary research in other fields (e.g., sport) has revealed that gaze training interventions may support the development of robust movement skills. This current study was designed to examine the utility of gaze training for technical laparoscopic skills and to test performance under multitasking conditions. Methods: Thirty medical trainees with no laparoscopic experience were divided randomly into one of three treatment groups: gaze trained (GAZE), movement trained (MOVE), and discovery learning/control (DISCOVERY). Participants were fitted with a Mobile Eye gaze registration system, which measures eye-line of gaze at 25 Hz. Training consisted of ten repetitions of the "eye-hand coordination" task from the LAP Mentor VR laparoscopic surgical simulator while receiving instruction and video feedback (specific to each treatment condition). After training, all participants completed a control test (designed to assess learning) and a multitasking transfer test, in which they completed the procedure while performing a concurrent tone counting task. Results: Not only did the GAZE group learn more quickly than the MOVE and DISCOVERY groups (faster completion times in the control test), but the performance difference was even more pronounced when multitasking. Differences in gaze control (target locking fixations), rather than tool movement measures (tool path length), underpinned this performance advantage for GAZE training. Conclusions: These results suggest that although the GAZE intervention focused on training gaze behavior only, there were indirect benefits for movement behaviors and performance efficiency. Additionally, focusing on a single external target when learning, rather than on complex movement patterns, may have freed-up attentional resources that could be applied to concurrent cognitive tasks. © 2011 The Author(s).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143393
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.54
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.695
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Economic and Social Research Council, UK
Research Grants Council, Hong KongRES-000-22-3016
Funding Information:

This work was supported by a bilateral research grant from the Economic and Social Research Council, UK and the Research Grants Council, Hong Kong (RES-000-22-3016) awarded to the first and fourth authors. The authors would like to acknowledge the assistance of James Brewer in recruiting participants and Ruth Johns in analyzing gaze data.

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWilson, MRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorVine, SJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBright, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorMasters, RSWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDefriend, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcGrath, JSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-24T10:05:14Z-
dc.date.available2011-11-24T10:05:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSurgical Endoscopy And Other Interventional Techniques, 2011, v. 25 n. 12, p. 3731-3739en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0930-2794en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143393-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The operating room environment is replete with stressors and distractions that increase the attention demands of what are already complex psychomotor procedures. Contemporary research in other fields (e.g., sport) has revealed that gaze training interventions may support the development of robust movement skills. This current study was designed to examine the utility of gaze training for technical laparoscopic skills and to test performance under multitasking conditions. Methods: Thirty medical trainees with no laparoscopic experience were divided randomly into one of three treatment groups: gaze trained (GAZE), movement trained (MOVE), and discovery learning/control (DISCOVERY). Participants were fitted with a Mobile Eye gaze registration system, which measures eye-line of gaze at 25 Hz. Training consisted of ten repetitions of the "eye-hand coordination" task from the LAP Mentor VR laparoscopic surgical simulator while receiving instruction and video feedback (specific to each treatment condition). After training, all participants completed a control test (designed to assess learning) and a multitasking transfer test, in which they completed the procedure while performing a concurrent tone counting task. Results: Not only did the GAZE group learn more quickly than the MOVE and DISCOVERY groups (faster completion times in the control test), but the performance difference was even more pronounced when multitasking. Differences in gaze control (target locking fixations), rather than tool movement measures (tool path length), underpinned this performance advantage for GAZE training. Conclusions: These results suggest that although the GAZE intervention focused on training gaze behavior only, there were indirect benefits for movement behaviors and performance efficiency. Additionally, focusing on a single external target when learning, rather than on complex movement patterns, may have freed-up attentional resources that could be applied to concurrent cognitive tasks. © 2011 The Author(s).en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00464/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSurgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniquesen_HK
dc.rightsThe Author(s)en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong Licenseen_US
dc.subjectDistractionsen_HK
dc.subjectEye-hand coordinationen_HK
dc.subjectGaze strategyen_HK
dc.subjectImplicit motor learningen_HK
dc.subjectPsychomotor controlen_HK
dc.subjectStressen_HK
dc.subject.meshClinical Competence - standards-
dc.subject.meshEducation, Medical - methods-
dc.subject.meshFixation, Ocular - physiology-
dc.subject.meshLaparoscopy - education-
dc.subject.meshPsychomotor Performance - physiology-
dc.titleGaze training enhances laparoscopic technical skill acquisition and multi-tasking performance: A randomized, controlled studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4551/resserv?sid=springerlink&genre=article&atitle=Gaze training enhances laparoscopic technical skill acquisition and multi-tasking performance: a randomized, controlled study&title=Surgical Endoscopy&issn=09302794&date=2011-12-01&volume=25&issue=12& spage=3731&authors=Mark R. Wilson, Samuel J. Vine, Elizabeth Bright, <i>et al.</i>en_US
dc.identifier.emailMasters, RSW: mastersr@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMasters, RSW=rp00935en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00464-011-1802-2en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21671125-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3213335-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-81955163031en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros197757en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-81955163031&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume25en_HK
dc.identifier.issue12en_HK
dc.identifier.spage3731en_HK
dc.identifier.epage3739en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1432-2218en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000297164700004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.description.otherSpringer Open Choice, 21 Feb 2012en_US
dc.relation.projectGaze strategies of laparoscopy surgeons: Observational learning, implicit knowledge and performance in demanding conditions-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilson, MR=7408663801en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVine, SJ=36811509000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBright, E=37460932200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMasters, RSW=7102880488en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDefriend, D=6603918469en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcGrath, JS=12774961300en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9435496-

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