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Article: Bioactive borate glass scaffolds: In vitro and in vivo evaluation for use as a drug delivery system in the treatment of bone infection

TitleBioactive borate glass scaffolds: In vitro and in vivo evaluation for use as a drug delivery system in the treatment of bone infection
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0957-4530
Citation
Journal Of Materials Science: Materials In Medicine, 2010, v. 21 n. 2, p. 575-582 How to Cite?
AbstractThe objective of this work was to evaluate borate bioactive glass scaffolds (with a composition in the system Na2O-K2O-MgO-CaO-B 2O3-P2O5) as devices for the release of the drug Vancomycin in the treatment of bone infection. A solution of ammonium phosphate, with or without dissolved Vancomycin, was used to bond borate glass particles into the shape of pellets. The in vitro degradation of the pellets and their conversion to a hydroxyapatite-type material in a simulated body fluid (SBF) were investigated using weight loss measurements, chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that greater than 90% of the glass in the scaffolds degraded within 1 week, to form poorly crystallized hydroxyapatite (HA). Pellets loaded with Vancomycin provided controlled release of the drug over 4 days. Vancomycin-loaded scaffolds were implanted into the right tibiae of rabbits infected with osteomyelitis. The efficacy of the treatment was assessed using microbiological examination and histology. The HA formed in the scaffolds in vivo, resulting from the conversion of the glass, served as structure to support the growth of new bone and blood vessels. The results in this work indicate that bioactive borate glass could provide a promising biodegradable and bioactive material for use as both a drug delivery system and a scaffold for bone repair. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143135
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.272
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.897
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Shanghai Committee of Science and Technology08441900500
nano-technology promotion project0952nm03400
Funding Information:

This work was supported by the Shanghai Committee of Science and Technology through the major project (Grant No. 08441900500) and the nano-technology promotion project (Grant No. 0952nm03400).

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Xen_HK
dc.contributor.authorXie, Zen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPan, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRahaman, MNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Xen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFu, Qen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Wen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-02T03:06:02Z-
dc.date.available2011-11-02T03:06:02Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Materials Science: Materials In Medicine, 2010, v. 21 n. 2, p. 575-582en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0957-4530en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143135-
dc.description.abstractThe objective of this work was to evaluate borate bioactive glass scaffolds (with a composition in the system Na2O-K2O-MgO-CaO-B 2O3-P2O5) as devices for the release of the drug Vancomycin in the treatment of bone infection. A solution of ammonium phosphate, with or without dissolved Vancomycin, was used to bond borate glass particles into the shape of pellets. The in vitro degradation of the pellets and their conversion to a hydroxyapatite-type material in a simulated body fluid (SBF) were investigated using weight loss measurements, chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that greater than 90% of the glass in the scaffolds degraded within 1 week, to form poorly crystallized hydroxyapatite (HA). Pellets loaded with Vancomycin provided controlled release of the drug over 4 days. Vancomycin-loaded scaffolds were implanted into the right tibiae of rabbits infected with osteomyelitis. The efficacy of the treatment was assessed using microbiological examination and histology. The HA formed in the scaffolds in vivo, resulting from the conversion of the glass, served as structure to support the growth of new bone and blood vessels. The results in this work indicate that bioactive borate glass could provide a promising biodegradable and bioactive material for use as both a drug delivery system and a scaffold for bone repair. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0957-4530en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicineen_HK
dc.titleBioactive borate glass scaffolds: In vitro and in vivo evaluation for use as a drug delivery system in the treatment of bone infectionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailPan, H:haobo@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPan, H=rp01564en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10856-009-3897-8en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19830527-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77951257205en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros176712-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77951257205&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume21en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage575en_HK
dc.identifier.epage582en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000274436300023-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, X=36064600700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXie, Z=25623840400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, C=9744814600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPan, H=7403295092en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRahaman, MN=7006601420en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, X=35224294000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFu, Q=36046915000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHuang, W=7407905904en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike5948697-

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