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Article: Effect of carbonate on hydroxyapatite Solubility
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TitleEffect of carbonate on hydroxyapatite Solubility
 
AuthorsPan, H2
Darvell, BW1
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/crystal
 
CitationCrystal Growth And Design, 2010, v. 10 n. 2, p. 845-850 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/cg901199h
 
AbstractCarbonate is present in biological apatites (BAp) (enamel, dentine, bone, and pathological calcifications) by substitution at phosphate and hydroxide sites, tending to increase its solubility in comparison with pure hydroxyapatite (HAp). The role of solution carbonate, however, is poorly understood. Using the solid titration method, it was found that the apparent solubility of HAp increased greatly with an increase in pCO2, and was sensitively-dependent at low values. No other phase was formed at the end point except HAp, and in particular no dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) was found. However, no carbonate was detected in the end-point solid except for a small amount at pH ∼ 7.4, pCO2 = 0.01-1.0 bar. The implications of these results need further investigation, bearing as they do on a central topic in oral chemistry. © 2010 American Chemical Society.
 
ISSN1528-7483
2012 Impact Factor: 4.689
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.358
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1021/cg901199h
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000274837000052
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorPan, H
 
dc.contributor.authorDarvell, BW
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-02T03:06:00Z
 
dc.date.available2011-11-02T03:06:00Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractCarbonate is present in biological apatites (BAp) (enamel, dentine, bone, and pathological calcifications) by substitution at phosphate and hydroxide sites, tending to increase its solubility in comparison with pure hydroxyapatite (HAp). The role of solution carbonate, however, is poorly understood. Using the solid titration method, it was found that the apparent solubility of HAp increased greatly with an increase in pCO2, and was sensitively-dependent at low values. No other phase was formed at the end point except HAp, and in particular no dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) was found. However, no carbonate was detected in the end-point solid except for a small amount at pH ∼ 7.4, pCO2 = 0.01-1.0 bar. The implications of these results need further investigation, bearing as they do on a central topic in oral chemistry. © 2010 American Chemical Society.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationCrystal Growth And Design, 2010, v. 10 n. 2, p. 845-850 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/cg901199h
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1021/cg901199h
 
dc.identifier.eissn1528-7505
 
dc.identifier.epage850
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000274837000052
 
dc.identifier.issn1528-7483
2012 Impact Factor: 4.689
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.358
 
dc.identifier.issue2
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-76349115841
 
dc.identifier.spage845
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143134
 
dc.identifier.volume10
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/crystal
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofCrystal Growth and Design
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.titleEffect of carbonate on hydroxyapatite Solubility
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. University of Kuwait
  2. The University of Hong Kong