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Article: Confirmatory factor analysis of the stagnation scale-a traditional chinese medicine construct operationalized for mental health practice

TitleConfirmatory factor analysis of the stagnation scale-a traditional chinese medicine construct operationalized for mental health practice
Authors
KeywordsConfirmatory factor analysis
Cutoff
Scale validation
Stagnation
Issue Date2012
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/journal/12529
Citation
International Journal Of Behavioral Medicine, 2012, v. 19 n. 2, p. 228-233 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground Traditional Chinese medicine stagnation ("yu") syndrome is characterized by a cluster of mind/body obstruction-like symptoms. Previous studies have operationalized the concept as a psychological construct through scale development, producing a three-factor 16-item inventory with good psychometric properties. Purpose The study aimed to further validate the Stagnation Scale by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and examine self-appraisal of stagnation as an illness. Method A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted on a random community sample of 755 adults recruited by cluster sampling in Hong Kong. Results CFA revealed a good fit of the three-factor model (CFI=.95; RMSEA=.077; SRMR=.043). ROC analysis suggested a cutoff score at 50 on stagnation total score for predicting self-appraisal of an illness condition, with false positive and negative rates at 25.8% and 23.3%, respectively. Overall, 6.2% participants self-appraised to suffer stagnation symptoms to a degree of an illness, and for it, 1.9% participants intended to seek treatment. Stagnation showed positive correlations with physical distress, depression, and anxiety (r=.59-.76, p<.01) and negative correlation with age (r=?.22, p<.01). Conclusion The Stagnation Scale appeared to be robust in factorial and construct validity. With prevalence of illness by self-appraisal at 6.2% and intention for treatment at 1.9%, stagnation is a fairly common condition associated with treatment-seeking behaviors. © International Society of Behavioral Medicine 2011.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143090
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.872
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.905
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, SMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFong, TCTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWang, XLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWang, YJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T03:08:48Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-28T03:08:48Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Behavioral Medicine, 2012, v. 19 n. 2, p. 228-233en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1070-5503en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143090-
dc.description.abstractBackground Traditional Chinese medicine stagnation ("yu") syndrome is characterized by a cluster of mind/body obstruction-like symptoms. Previous studies have operationalized the concept as a psychological construct through scale development, producing a three-factor 16-item inventory with good psychometric properties. Purpose The study aimed to further validate the Stagnation Scale by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and examine self-appraisal of stagnation as an illness. Method A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted on a random community sample of 755 adults recruited by cluster sampling in Hong Kong. Results CFA revealed a good fit of the three-factor model (CFI=.95; RMSEA=.077; SRMR=.043). ROC analysis suggested a cutoff score at 50 on stagnation total score for predicting self-appraisal of an illness condition, with false positive and negative rates at 25.8% and 23.3%, respectively. Overall, 6.2% participants self-appraised to suffer stagnation symptoms to a degree of an illness, and for it, 1.9% participants intended to seek treatment. Stagnation showed positive correlations with physical distress, depression, and anxiety (r=.59-.76, p<.01) and negative correlation with age (r=?.22, p<.01). Conclusion The Stagnation Scale appeared to be robust in factorial and construct validity. With prevalence of illness by self-appraisal at 6.2% and intention for treatment at 1.9%, stagnation is a fairly common condition associated with treatment-seeking behaviors. © International Society of Behavioral Medicine 2011.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/journal/12529en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Behavioral Medicineen_HK
dc.rightsThe Author(s)en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong Licenseen_US
dc.subjectConfirmatory factor analysisen_HK
dc.subjectCutoffen_HK
dc.subjectScale validationen_HK
dc.subjectStagnationen_HK
dc.titleConfirmatory factor analysis of the stagnation scale-a traditional chinese medicine construct operationalized for mental health practiceen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4551/resserv?sid=springerlink&genre=article&atitle=Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Stagnation Scale—A Traditional Chinese Medicine Construct Operationalized for Mental Health Practice&title=International Journal of Behavioral Medicine&issn=10705503&date=2011-01-30& spage=1&authors=Siu-man Ng, Ted Chun Tat Fong, Xiao-lu Wang, <i>et al.</i>en_US
dc.identifier.emailNg, SM: ngsiuman@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWang, XL: wangxl@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNg, SM=rp00611en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWang, XL=rp00877en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12529-011-9146-9en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21279709-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84863777231en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros184564en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros202678-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84863777231&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume19en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage228en_HK
dc.identifier.epage233en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1532-7558en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000304399500011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.description.otherSpringer Open Choice, 21 Feb 2012en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, SM=7403358478en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFong, TCT=35181175800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, XL=36859773100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, YJ=55312454200en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike8767924-

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