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Conference Paper: Historical overview of planetary nebulae research

TitleHistorical overview of planetary nebulae research
Authors
KeywordsBinaries: general
planetary nebulae: general
stars: AGB and post AGB
stars: evolution
Issue Date2011
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=IAU
Citation
The IAU Symposium No. 283: "Planetary Nebulae: an Eye to the Future", Puerto de la Cruz, Tenerife, Spain, 25-29 July 2011. In Proceedings of the IAU Symposium No. 283, 2012 How to Cite?
AbstractPlanetary nebulae (PNs) were first discovered over 200 years ago and our understanding of these objects has undergone significant evolution over the years. Developments in astronomical optical spectroscopy and atomic physics have shown that PNe are gaseous objects photoionized by UV radiation from a hot central star. Studies of the kinematics of the nebulae coupled with progress in theories of stellar evolution have led to the identification that PNe are evolved stars and progenitors of white dwarfs. Development of infrared and millimeter-wave technology in the 1970s made us realize that there is significant amount of neutral matter (molecules and dust) in PNe. The link of PNe to the stellar winds from their progenitor asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and subsequent dynamical interactions are now believed to be the underlying causes of the morphological structures of PNe. The role of PNe as prolific molecular factories producing complex molecules and organic solids has significant implications on the chemical enrichment of the Galaxy. In this paper, we discuss the misconceptions and errors that we have encountered in our journey of understanding the nature of PN. The various detours and dead ends that had happened during our quest to pin down the evolutionary status and causes of nebulae ejection will be discussed. As there are still many unsolved problems in PN research, these lessons of history have much to offer for future progress in this field. © 2012 International Astronomical Union.
DescriptionInvited_talk - Session 1: New Results from Observations
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143084
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.105
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKwok, Sen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T03:08:08Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-28T03:08:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe IAU Symposium No. 283: "Planetary Nebulae: an Eye to the Future", Puerto de la Cruz, Tenerife, Spain, 25-29 July 2011. In Proceedings of the IAU Symposium No. 283, 2012en_US
dc.identifier.issn1743-9213en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143084-
dc.descriptionInvited_talk - Session 1: New Results from Observationsen_US
dc.description.abstractPlanetary nebulae (PNs) were first discovered over 200 years ago and our understanding of these objects has undergone significant evolution over the years. Developments in astronomical optical spectroscopy and atomic physics have shown that PNe are gaseous objects photoionized by UV radiation from a hot central star. Studies of the kinematics of the nebulae coupled with progress in theories of stellar evolution have led to the identification that PNe are evolved stars and progenitors of white dwarfs. Development of infrared and millimeter-wave technology in the 1970s made us realize that there is significant amount of neutral matter (molecules and dust) in PNe. The link of PNe to the stellar winds from their progenitor asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and subsequent dynamical interactions are now believed to be the underlying causes of the morphological structures of PNe. The role of PNe as prolific molecular factories producing complex molecules and organic solids has significant implications on the chemical enrichment of the Galaxy. In this paper, we discuss the misconceptions and errors that we have encountered in our journey of understanding the nature of PN. The various detours and dead ends that had happened during our quest to pin down the evolutionary status and causes of nebulae ejection will be discussed. As there are still many unsolved problems in PN research, these lessons of history have much to offer for future progress in this field. © 2012 International Astronomical Union.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=IAUen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the International Astronomical Unionen_HK
dc.subjectBinaries: generalen_HK
dc.subjectplanetary nebulae: generalen_HK
dc.subjectstars: AGB and post AGBen_HK
dc.subjectstars: evolutionen_HK
dc.titleHistorical overview of planetary nebulae researchen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKwok, S: deannote@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKwok, S=rp00716en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S1743921312010605en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84865724449en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros196788en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84865724449&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume7en_HK
dc.identifier.issueS283en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1en_HK
dc.identifier.epage8en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000309944800001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.description.otherThe IAU Symposium No. 283: "Planetary Nebulae: an Eye to the Future", Puerto de la Cruz, Tenerife, Spain, 25-29 July 2011. In Proceedings of the IAU Symposium No. 283, 2012-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwok, S=22980498300en_HK

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