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Book Chapter: Building Inclusive Societies: The Role of Substantive Equality, Ideas of Justice and Deliberative Theory

TitleBuilding Inclusive Societies: The Role of Substantive Equality, Ideas of Justice and Deliberative Theory
Authors
KeywordsMulticulturalism
Citizenship
Deliberative theory
Justice
Substantive equality
Issue Date2011
PublisherHasselt University
Citation
Building Inclusive Societies: The Role of Substantive Equality, Ideas of Justice and Deliberative Theory. In Joz Motmans, Daniël Cuypers, Petra Meier et al. (Eds.), Equal is not Enough: Challenging Differences and Inequalities in Contemporary Societies, p. 24-42. Antwerp, Belgium: Hasselt University, 2011 How to Cite?
AbstractThe coexistence of cultural and religious minorities in liberal democratic systems presents various complexities. Faced with a choice between acculturation and assimilation, minorities routinely struggle for justice and experience discrimination and exclusion. Modern political discourse has traditionally drawn on ideas such as tolerance, accommodation and assimilation and group rights to protect minorities on the basis of attributes perceived to be constitutive of their cultural, religious or national identities. The chapter presents a brief overview of the difficulties inherent in political models such as liberalism, liberal multiculturalism and limited self-government used to reconcile the status of cultural and national minorities in plural societies. These frameworks fix the political subject into rigid categories, highlighting their lack of political sensibility given the fluidity of identity today. This chapter argues that immigrant minorities exhibit complex layers of identity that challenge the singularity and mono-dimensionality attributed to political loyalty, citizenship and political identity in an age of plurinational states. Drawing on theories of identity-matrixing, it is argued that the deconstruction of identity is indispensable to better understanding and effectively influencing the development of sentiments of loyalty, group affiliation and shared morality. This chapter draws on theories of justice, deliberative theory and principles of substantive equality to illustrate how belonging, commonality of purpose and loyalty can be cultivated through regular engagement with other groups in deliberative decision-making processes. Deliberative theory and substantive capacity-building measures to ensure meaningful participation have the potential to transform multicultural societies into multicultural polities by securing inclusive governance.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143048
SSRN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKapai, Pen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T03:05:19Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-28T03:05:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationBuilding Inclusive Societies: The Role of Substantive Equality, Ideas of Justice and Deliberative Theory. In Joz Motmans, Daniël Cuypers, Petra Meier et al. (Eds.), Equal is not Enough: Challenging Differences and Inequalities in Contemporary Societies, p. 24-42. Antwerp, Belgium: Hasselt University, 2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143048-
dc.description.abstractThe coexistence of cultural and religious minorities in liberal democratic systems presents various complexities. Faced with a choice between acculturation and assimilation, minorities routinely struggle for justice and experience discrimination and exclusion. Modern political discourse has traditionally drawn on ideas such as tolerance, accommodation and assimilation and group rights to protect minorities on the basis of attributes perceived to be constitutive of their cultural, religious or national identities. The chapter presents a brief overview of the difficulties inherent in political models such as liberalism, liberal multiculturalism and limited self-government used to reconcile the status of cultural and national minorities in plural societies. These frameworks fix the political subject into rigid categories, highlighting their lack of political sensibility given the fluidity of identity today. This chapter argues that immigrant minorities exhibit complex layers of identity that challenge the singularity and mono-dimensionality attributed to political loyalty, citizenship and political identity in an age of plurinational states. Drawing on theories of identity-matrixing, it is argued that the deconstruction of identity is indispensable to better understanding and effectively influencing the development of sentiments of loyalty, group affiliation and shared morality. This chapter draws on theories of justice, deliberative theory and principles of substantive equality to illustrate how belonging, commonality of purpose and loyalty can be cultivated through regular engagement with other groups in deliberative decision-making processes. Deliberative theory and substantive capacity-building measures to ensure meaningful participation have the potential to transform multicultural societies into multicultural polities by securing inclusive governance.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHasselt Universityen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEqual is not Enough: Challenging Differences and Inequalities in Contemporary Societiesen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectMulticulturalism-
dc.subjectCitizenship-
dc.subjectDeliberative theory-
dc.subjectJustice-
dc.subjectSubstantive equality-
dc.titleBuilding Inclusive Societies: The Role of Substantive Equality, Ideas of Justice and Deliberative Theoryen_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailKapai, P: puja@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityKapai, P=rp01254en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros197148en_US
dc.identifier.spage24-
dc.identifier.epage42-
dc.publisher.placeAntwerp, Belgium-
dc.identifier.ssrn1988195-
dc.identifier.hkulrp2012/010-

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