File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Confucius the Chameleon: Dubious envoy for Brand China

TitleConfucius the Chameleon: Dubious envoy for Brand China
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherDuke University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://boundary2.dukejournals.org
Citation
Boundary 2, 2011, v. 38 n. 1, p. 77-100 How to Cite?
AbstractIn the last century, scholars and politicians in China have attempted both in theory and in practice to advocate and carry out radically different social policies and political reforms, often in the name of Confucius. With China's rise and her increasing international power and status in recent years, Chinese policy makers have again used the Confucius label as part of their charm offensive to win friends and influence in the world. This essay traces the major interpretations of Confucius and the social manifestations of those evaluations in the twentieth century, culminating in the establishment and mushrooming of Confucius Institutes throughout the world in the last few years. While the globalization of Chinese culture is inevitable, the attempts to name and institutionalize it as modernized Confucianism has the effect of injecting inconsistencies into a system that is already overflowing with internal contradictions and inequities. © 2011 by Duke University Press.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142999
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.377
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.238
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLouie, Ken_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T03:01:49Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-28T03:01:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBoundary 2, 2011, v. 38 n. 1, p. 77-100en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0190-3659en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142999-
dc.description.abstractIn the last century, scholars and politicians in China have attempted both in theory and in practice to advocate and carry out radically different social policies and political reforms, often in the name of Confucius. With China's rise and her increasing international power and status in recent years, Chinese policy makers have again used the Confucius label as part of their charm offensive to win friends and influence in the world. This essay traces the major interpretations of Confucius and the social manifestations of those evaluations in the twentieth century, culminating in the establishment and mushrooming of Confucius Institutes throughout the world in the last few years. While the globalization of Chinese culture is inevitable, the attempts to name and institutionalize it as modernized Confucianism has the effect of injecting inconsistencies into a system that is already overflowing with internal contradictions and inequities. © 2011 by Duke University Press.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherDuke University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://boundary2.dukejournals.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBoundary 2en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleConfucius the Chameleon: Dubious envoy for Brand Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0190-3659&volume=38&issue=1&spage=77&epage=100&date=2011&atitle=Confucius+the+Chameleon:+dubious+envoy+for+%27Brand+China%27-
dc.identifier.emailLouie, K:kamlouie@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLouie, K=rp01132en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1215/01903659-1262554en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79952769861en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros196704en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79952769861&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume38en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage77en_HK
dc.identifier.epage100en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000287699900004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats