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Article: Come rain or shine: The combined effects of physical stresses on physiological and protein-level responses of an intertidal limpet in the monsoonal tropics

TitleCome rain or shine: The combined effects of physical stresses on physiological and protein-level responses of an intertidal limpet in the monsoonal tropics
Authors
KeywordsEnvironmental stress
Heart rate
Heat stress
Interactive effects
Monsoon rain
Protein profiles
Rocky intertidal
Issue Date2011
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/FEC
Citation
Functional Ecology, 2011, v. 25 n. 1, p. 101-110 How to Cite?
Abstract1.Traditional approaches to understanding species responses to environmental conditions have focused on the isolated effects of single stressors, despite the fact that in nature organisms experience a variety of conditions. 2.In tropical monsoonal areas, intertidal animals can face hot desiccating conditions during emersion preceded, or followed by, intense rainfall. The combined effects of these stresses on physiological responses and protein profiles were investigated in a limpet, Cellana grata. 3.With short exposure (60min) to single stressors, heat stressed limpets had elevated heart rates and more concentrated haemolymph and mantle water osmolalities than under normal temperatures or awash. Animals under rain had reduced haemolymph and mantle water osmolalities, but similar heart rates to unstressed animals. 4.After 120min, unstressed animals did not differ in their physiological responses. Heat stressed limpets, however, had faster heart rates and more concentrated haemolymph and mantle water osmolalities, whilst those under rain had the lowest osmolalities, but similar heart rates to unstressed animals. 5.Limpets under rain followed by heat stress had faster heart rates, but lower haemolymph and mantle water osmolalities compared to animals under normal temperatures or heat stress. Limpets that were heat stressed, followed by rain, had similar heart rates to animals awash, under rain or normal temperatures but lower haemolymph osmolalities than other treatments, with the exception of limpets under rain. 6.There was a positive relationship between haemolymph and mantle water osmolalities, except for animals under rain, where mantle water osmolality was lower than the haemolymph, suggesting some isolation of body fluids from the external medium. 7.Haemolymph protein/peptide mass spectra of heat stressed animals (either before or after rain) were similar, while all other treatments differed, suggesting differential expression and regulation of proteins. 8.Heat stress invokes a more active physiological and protein level response than rain, but their combination had an interactive effect on limpets' metabolism. 9.Identifying the effects of multiple stresses at a variety of biological levels highlights the interactive effects which impact species, and provides a more complete understanding of how species may respond to environmental changes in their natural habitats. © 2010 The Authors. Functional Ecology © 2010 British Ecological Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142941
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.21
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.061
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Strategic Research Theme of Sustainable Environment (Sustainable Water)
Faculty of Science of the University of Hong Kong
University of Hong Kong200707176090
200807176202
Funding Information:

We are grateful to the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department, Hong Kong Government for permission to work in the Cape d'Aguilar Marine Reserve. Excellent technical assistance was provided by Ms Cecily Law and laboratory assistance from Ms June Leung and Ms Vera Shan. We thank colleagues at the Swire Institute of Marine Science for their active involvement in discussions on experimental design and analysis especially Drs Kenny Leung and V. ThiyagaRajan. Prof Ron Hill advised on the use of the rain machine and Mr Juilian Yeung (Department of Psychiatry, HKU) wrote the peak alignment program using PERL programming language. Priscilla Leung was partially supported by the Strategic Research Theme of Sustainable Environment (Sustainable Water) and the Faculty of Science of the University of Hong Kong. This project was partly supported by Small Project Funding from The University of Hong Kong (200707176090 and 200807176202).

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, GAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDe Pirro, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorCartwright, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKhangura, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorNg, WCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, PTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMorritt, Den_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T02:59:27Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-28T02:59:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationFunctional Ecology, 2011, v. 25 n. 1, p. 101-110en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0269-8463en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142941-
dc.description.abstract1.Traditional approaches to understanding species responses to environmental conditions have focused on the isolated effects of single stressors, despite the fact that in nature organisms experience a variety of conditions. 2.In tropical monsoonal areas, intertidal animals can face hot desiccating conditions during emersion preceded, or followed by, intense rainfall. The combined effects of these stresses on physiological responses and protein profiles were investigated in a limpet, Cellana grata. 3.With short exposure (60min) to single stressors, heat stressed limpets had elevated heart rates and more concentrated haemolymph and mantle water osmolalities than under normal temperatures or awash. Animals under rain had reduced haemolymph and mantle water osmolalities, but similar heart rates to unstressed animals. 4.After 120min, unstressed animals did not differ in their physiological responses. Heat stressed limpets, however, had faster heart rates and more concentrated haemolymph and mantle water osmolalities, whilst those under rain had the lowest osmolalities, but similar heart rates to unstressed animals. 5.Limpets under rain followed by heat stress had faster heart rates, but lower haemolymph and mantle water osmolalities compared to animals under normal temperatures or heat stress. Limpets that were heat stressed, followed by rain, had similar heart rates to animals awash, under rain or normal temperatures but lower haemolymph osmolalities than other treatments, with the exception of limpets under rain. 6.There was a positive relationship between haemolymph and mantle water osmolalities, except for animals under rain, where mantle water osmolality was lower than the haemolymph, suggesting some isolation of body fluids from the external medium. 7.Haemolymph protein/peptide mass spectra of heat stressed animals (either before or after rain) were similar, while all other treatments differed, suggesting differential expression and regulation of proteins. 8.Heat stress invokes a more active physiological and protein level response than rain, but their combination had an interactive effect on limpets' metabolism. 9.Identifying the effects of multiple stresses at a variety of biological levels highlights the interactive effects which impact species, and provides a more complete understanding of how species may respond to environmental changes in their natural habitats. © 2010 The Authors. Functional Ecology © 2010 British Ecological Society.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/FECen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofFunctional Ecologyen_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.subjectEnvironmental stressen_HK
dc.subjectHeart rateen_HK
dc.subjectHeat stressen_HK
dc.subjectInteractive effectsen_HK
dc.subjectMonsoon rainen_HK
dc.subjectProtein profilesen_HK
dc.subjectRocky intertidalen_HK
dc.titleCome rain or shine: The combined effects of physical stresses on physiological and protein-level responses of an intertidal limpet in the monsoonal tropicsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWilliams, GA: hrsbwga@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWilliams, GA=rp00804en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2435.2010.01760.xen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78751697335en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros184398en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78751697335&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume25en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage101en_HK
dc.identifier.epage110en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1365-2435-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000286468500010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilliams, GA=7406082821en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDe Pirro, M=6602987656en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCartwright, S=15753628900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKhangura, K=39761881400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, WC=24723024100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, PT=35740926800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMorritt, D=7003560499en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike8760269-

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