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Conference Paper: Surface modification of magensium-based orthopaedic implants by AL203 plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII)

TitleSurface modification of magensium-based orthopaedic implants by AL203 plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII)
Authors
Issue Date2010
Citation
The 7th SICOT/SIROT Annual International Conference combined meeting with the Swedish Orthopaedic Association (SOF), Gothenburg, Sweden, 31 August-3 September 2010. How to Cite?
AbstractMetallic implants are commonly applied for fracture fixation. One desirable characteristic of an implant is its ability to be degraded after bone healing, thus implants made from degradable metals, including magnesium-based alloys, may substitute conventionally used metals. However, problems associated with use of magnesium alloys include its rapid corrosion and hydrogen gas release. Surface modification may be used to solve these problems. Our group has recently applied an Al2O3 layer using PIII technology onto magnesium alloy to enhance its corrosion resistance. This study aims to investigate the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of the Al2O3 plasma-treated magnesium alloy. To evaluate the corrosion resistance properties of the plasma-treated magnesium alloy, the immersion test using DMEM medium was conducted at 37ºC for 1 and 3 day(s). Green fluorescent protein osteoblasts (GFPOB) were cultured on plasma-treated and untreated samples for 1 and 3 day(s) to evaluate their cell attachment and proliferation. Gas bubbles were observed on day 1 on the untreated sample where the medium changed from red to purple on day 3, indicating that vigorous corrosion had occurred. No gas bubbles or colour change of the medium was observed for the Al2O3 plasma-treated sample. This suggested that the Al2O3 layer was able to improve the corrosion resistance of the magnesium alloy. The GFPOBs grew on the plasma-treated sample but not the untreated sample, which indicated good biocompatibility with the plasma-treated sample. Future mechanical property studies during corrosion are required for further validation of this material for clinical use.
DescriptionLecture
Free Papers Session - Biomaterials: abstract no. 25327
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142859

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYeung, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, HMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, KOen_US
dc.contributor.authorTam, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorChu, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorLuk, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Ken_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T02:57:30Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-28T02:57:30Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 7th SICOT/SIROT Annual International Conference combined meeting with the Swedish Orthopaedic Association (SOF), Gothenburg, Sweden, 31 August-3 September 2010.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142859-
dc.descriptionLecture-
dc.descriptionFree Papers Session - Biomaterials: abstract no. 25327-
dc.description.abstractMetallic implants are commonly applied for fracture fixation. One desirable characteristic of an implant is its ability to be degraded after bone healing, thus implants made from degradable metals, including magnesium-based alloys, may substitute conventionally used metals. However, problems associated with use of magnesium alloys include its rapid corrosion and hydrogen gas release. Surface modification may be used to solve these problems. Our group has recently applied an Al2O3 layer using PIII technology onto magnesium alloy to enhance its corrosion resistance. This study aims to investigate the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of the Al2O3 plasma-treated magnesium alloy. To evaluate the corrosion resistance properties of the plasma-treated magnesium alloy, the immersion test using DMEM medium was conducted at 37ºC for 1 and 3 day(s). Green fluorescent protein osteoblasts (GFPOB) were cultured on plasma-treated and untreated samples for 1 and 3 day(s) to evaluate their cell attachment and proliferation. Gas bubbles were observed on day 1 on the untreated sample where the medium changed from red to purple on day 3, indicating that vigorous corrosion had occurred. No gas bubbles or colour change of the medium was observed for the Al2O3 plasma-treated sample. This suggested that the Al2O3 layer was able to improve the corrosion resistance of the magnesium alloy. The GFPOBs grew on the plasma-treated sample but not the untreated sample, which indicated good biocompatibility with the plasma-treated sample. Future mechanical property studies during corrosion are required for further validation of this material for clinical use.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSICOT/SIROT Annual International Conferenceen_US
dc.titleSurface modification of magensium-based orthopaedic implants by AL203 plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII)en_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailYeung, K: wkkyeung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, KO: smallon@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailTam, V: vivtam@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLuk, K: hcm21000@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, K: cheungmc@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYeung, K=rp00309en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLuk, K=rp00333en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros197026en_US
dc.description.otherThe 7th SICOT/SIROT Annual International Conference combined meeting with the Swedish Orthopaedic Association (SOF), Gothenburg, Sweden, 31 August-3 September 2010.-

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