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Conference Paper: Medical student readiness to provide lifestyle counselling for patients

TitleMedical student readiness to provide lifestyle counselling for patients
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherAssociation for Medical Education in Europe. The Conference's web site is located at http://www.amee.org/conferences/amee-past-conferences
Citation
The 2010 Conference of the Association for Medical Education in Europe (AMEE), Glasgow, UK., 4-8 September 2010. In AMEE 2010 Abstracts, 2010, p. 340-341, abstract no. 814 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Lifestyle factors such as tobacco use, obesity, diet and physical inactivity are leading causes of preventable morbidity and mortality. With changing population dynamics and rise of chronic disease, the development of skill and competency in preventive medicine is an important aspect of undergraduate education. Curriculum structures have led to a fragmented approach to preventive medicine education. We aimed to assess the impact of health promotion education within the current undergraduate curricula to 1) determine current knowledge, attitudes and skills and 2) identify predictors of health promotion practice. SUMMARY OF WORK: Health promotion knowledge, attitudes and skills questionnaire was completed by 462 of 578 (80% response rate) undergraduate medical students in years 1 - 4. SUMMARY OF RESULTS: Overall students’ had positive attitudes to the role of preventive medicine and health promotion. Self-perceived competence and skill increased with experience. Students identified a number of health promotion intervention barriers and facilitators in clinical practice. Students felt adequately prepared to undertake tobacco smoking and physical activity and poorly prepared for sexual practice and illicit drug use health promotion interventions. CONCLUSIONS: A non-systematic approach to the acquisition of health promotion knowledge and skills may be a barrier to the development of key competencies. Over emphasis in some subject areas may lead to less positive attitudes to health promotion and to inadequate education and training in others. TAKE-HOME MESSAGES: Coordinated, integrated and more skills based approach to preventive medicine education is needed in undergraduate curricula.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142807

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorKoon, Wen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T02:55:45Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-28T02:55:45Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2010 Conference of the Association for Medical Education in Europe (AMEE), Glasgow, UK., 4-8 September 2010. In AMEE 2010 Abstracts, 2010, p. 340-341, abstract no. 814en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142807-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Lifestyle factors such as tobacco use, obesity, diet and physical inactivity are leading causes of preventable morbidity and mortality. With changing population dynamics and rise of chronic disease, the development of skill and competency in preventive medicine is an important aspect of undergraduate education. Curriculum structures have led to a fragmented approach to preventive medicine education. We aimed to assess the impact of health promotion education within the current undergraduate curricula to 1) determine current knowledge, attitudes and skills and 2) identify predictors of health promotion practice. SUMMARY OF WORK: Health promotion knowledge, attitudes and skills questionnaire was completed by 462 of 578 (80% response rate) undergraduate medical students in years 1 - 4. SUMMARY OF RESULTS: Overall students’ had positive attitudes to the role of preventive medicine and health promotion. Self-perceived competence and skill increased with experience. Students identified a number of health promotion intervention barriers and facilitators in clinical practice. Students felt adequately prepared to undertake tobacco smoking and physical activity and poorly prepared for sexual practice and illicit drug use health promotion interventions. CONCLUSIONS: A non-systematic approach to the acquisition of health promotion knowledge and skills may be a barrier to the development of key competencies. Over emphasis in some subject areas may lead to less positive attitudes to health promotion and to inadequate education and training in others. TAKE-HOME MESSAGES: Coordinated, integrated and more skills based approach to preventive medicine education is needed in undergraduate curricula.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Medical Education in Europe. The Conference's web site is located at http://www.amee.org/conferences/amee-past-conferencesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAMEE 2010 Abstractsen_US
dc.titleMedical student readiness to provide lifestyle counselling for patientsen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailJohnston, J: jjohnsto@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityJohnston, J=rp00375en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros184322en_US
dc.identifier.spage340en_US
dc.identifier.epage341en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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