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Article: Probing the allocation of attention in implicit (motor) learning
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TitleProbing the allocation of attention in implicit (motor) learning
 
AuthorsLam, WK1
Maxwell, JP1
Masters, RSW1
 
KeywordsAttention demand
Automaticity
Errorless learning
Explicit
Working memory
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherTaylor & Francis Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02640414.asp
 
CitationJournal Of Sports Sciences, 2010, v. 28 n. 14, p. 1543-1554 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2010.517543
 
AbstractWe investigated the attention demands associated with implicit and explicit (motor) learning and performance using a probe reaction time paradigm. Two groups of participants learned a golf putting task over eight blocks of 50 trials performed from different distances. One group (errorless learning) began putting from the shortest distance (25 cm) and moved progressively back to the furthest distance (200 cm). A second group (errorful learning) began putting from the furthest distance (200 cm) and moved progressively closer (25 cm). Retention tests were used to assess learning in the two conditions, followed by transfer tests in which participants used either an unusual putter or a very unusual putter. Transfer to the unusual putters had an equivalent effect on the performance of both errorless and errorful learners, but probe reaction times were unaffected in the errorless learners, suggesting that execution of their movements was associated with reduced attention demands. Reducing errors during initial learning trials may encourage an implicit mode of learning and lower the demand for cognitive resources in subsequent performance. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.
 
ISSN0264-0414
2013 Impact Factor: 2.095
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2010.517543
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000284891700007
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Research Grants CouncilHKU 7231/04H
Funding Information:

This research was supported by a Competitive Earmarked Research Grant (HKU 7231/04H) awarded to the second and third authors by the Hong Kong Research Grants Council. The second author, Dr. Jon Maxwell, passed away on Sunday 25 January 2009, during the writing of this paper. Jon Max inspired us and challenged our thinking always. We were privileged to work with him.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
GrantsInstruction, errorless learning and rehabilitation: Taking the spanner out of the works?
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLam, WK
 
dc.contributor.authorMaxwell, JP
 
dc.contributor.authorMasters, RSW
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T02:52:34Z
 
dc.date.available2011-10-28T02:52:34Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractWe investigated the attention demands associated with implicit and explicit (motor) learning and performance using a probe reaction time paradigm. Two groups of participants learned a golf putting task over eight blocks of 50 trials performed from different distances. One group (errorless learning) began putting from the shortest distance (25 cm) and moved progressively back to the furthest distance (200 cm). A second group (errorful learning) began putting from the furthest distance (200 cm) and moved progressively closer (25 cm). Retention tests were used to assess learning in the two conditions, followed by transfer tests in which participants used either an unusual putter or a very unusual putter. Transfer to the unusual putters had an equivalent effect on the performance of both errorless and errorful learners, but probe reaction times were unaffected in the errorless learners, suggesting that execution of their movements was associated with reduced attention demands. Reducing errors during initial learning trials may encourage an implicit mode of learning and lower the demand for cognitive resources in subsequent performance. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Sports Sciences, 2010, v. 28 n. 14, p. 1543-1554 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2010.517543
 
dc.identifier.citeulike8402262
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2010.517543
 
dc.identifier.epage1554
 
dc.identifier.hkuros184174
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000284891700007
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Research Grants CouncilHKU 7231/04H
Funding Information:

This research was supported by a Competitive Earmarked Research Grant (HKU 7231/04H) awarded to the second and third authors by the Hong Kong Research Grants Council. The second author, Dr. Jon Maxwell, passed away on Sunday 25 January 2009, during the writing of this paper. Jon Max inspired us and challenged our thinking always. We were privileged to work with him.

 
dc.identifier.issn0264-0414
2013 Impact Factor: 2.095
 
dc.identifier.issue14
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid21049315
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78649757614
 
dc.identifier.spage1543
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142600
 
dc.identifier.volume28
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02640414.asp
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Sports Sciences
 
dc.relation.projectInstruction, errorless learning and rehabilitation: Taking the spanner out of the works?
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAttention
 
dc.subject.meshGolf - psychology
 
dc.subject.meshLearning
 
dc.subject.meshMotor Skills
 
dc.subject.meshPhysical Education and Training
 
dc.subjectAttention demand
 
dc.subjectAutomaticity
 
dc.subjectErrorless learning
 
dc.subjectExplicit
 
dc.subjectWorking memory
 
dc.titleProbing the allocation of attention in implicit (motor) learning
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong