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Article: An implicit basis for the retention benefits of random practice

TitleAn implicit basis for the retention benefits of random practice
Authors
Keywordscognitive effort
contextual interference
explicit motor learning
implicit motor learning
Issue Date2011
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00222895.asp
Citation
Journal Of Motor Behavior, 2011, v. 43 n. 1, p. 1-13 How to Cite?
Abstract
The cognitive effort explanations of contextual interference (CI) and implicit motor learning represent a paradox in which cognitive involvement is seen to be advantageous or disadvantageous for learning. The authors aimed to resolve this paradox by measuring cognitive effort and working memory dependence during low and high CI practice on two Australian Rules Football tasks (kicking and handball). Measures of cognitive effort included: kicking and handball outcome performance during acquisition and during a test of retention, performance on a probe reaction time task during a sample of acquisition trials, and self-reported levels of cognitive effort. Measures of implicit and explicit learning included kicking and handball performance during a secondary task transfer, and self-report verbal protocols (number of verbal rules and hypotheses reported). The results suggest that high CI may cause an implicit mode of learning, perhaps due to the interference caused by task switching. However, these findings are restricted to the more complex of the 2 tasks (kicking). Copyright © 2011 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142599
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 1.406
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.665
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Victoria University Melbourne
  3. Australian Institute of Sport
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRendell, MAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMasters, RSWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFarrow, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Ten_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T02:52:33Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-28T02:52:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Motor Behavior, 2011, v. 43 n. 1, p. 1-13en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-2895en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142599-
dc.description.abstractThe cognitive effort explanations of contextual interference (CI) and implicit motor learning represent a paradox in which cognitive involvement is seen to be advantageous or disadvantageous for learning. The authors aimed to resolve this paradox by measuring cognitive effort and working memory dependence during low and high CI practice on two Australian Rules Football tasks (kicking and handball). Measures of cognitive effort included: kicking and handball outcome performance during acquisition and during a test of retention, performance on a probe reaction time task during a sample of acquisition trials, and self-reported levels of cognitive effort. Measures of implicit and explicit learning included kicking and handball performance during a secondary task transfer, and self-report verbal protocols (number of verbal rules and hypotheses reported). The results suggest that high CI may cause an implicit mode of learning, perhaps due to the interference caused by task switching. However, these findings are restricted to the more complex of the 2 tasks (kicking). Copyright © 2011 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00222895.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Motor Behavioren_HK
dc.subjectcognitive efforten_HK
dc.subjectcontextual interferenceen_HK
dc.subjectexplicit motor learningen_HK
dc.subjectimplicit motor learningen_HK
dc.subject.meshAthletic Performance - psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCognitionen_US
dc.subject.meshMotor Skillsen_US
dc.subject.meshPractice (Psychology)en_US
dc.subject.meshRetention (Psychology)en_US
dc.titleAn implicit basis for the retention benefits of random practiceen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailMasters, RSW: mastersr@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMasters, RSW=rp00935en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00222895.2010.530304en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21186459en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78651273198en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros184169en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78651273198&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume43en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1en_HK
dc.identifier.epage13en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000286817000001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRendell, MA=35743512300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMasters, RSW=7102880488en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFarrow, D=7006613807en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMorris, T=55126480600en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike8494174-

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