File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Relationships between explanatory style, posttraumatic growth and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms among Chinese breast cancer patients

TitleRelationships between explanatory style, posttraumatic growth and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms among Chinese breast cancer patients
Authors
KeywordsCancer
Explanatory style
Posttraumatic growth
Issue Date2011
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/08870446.asp
Citation
Psychology And Health, 2011, v. 26 n. 3, p. 269-285 How to Cite?
AbstractMany existing models posit that cognitive processing style is an important factor affecting self-perceived positive changes. In this study, the effects of explanatory style (the manner in which people cognitively process and explain why they experience good and bad events) on both posttraumatic growth (PTG) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms were examined among 90 Chinese women with breast cancer. It was found that explanatory style for good events, but not for bad events, was significantly associated with self-reported PTG. Women who attributed the causes of positive events to internal, global and stable factors tended to report more posttraumatic growth. In contrast, explanatory style for bad events, as opposed to good events, was significantly and positively correlated with PTSD symptoms. Among the three dimensions of explanatory style (internal, stable and global), the tendency to globalise the causes of good and bad events were the most important predictors of self-reported PTG and PTSD symptoms, respectively. While enhancing an optimistic explanatory style for bad events might reduce posttraumatic stress symptoms, cultivating an optimistic explanatory style for good events is likely to increase self-perceived positive changes after breast cancer diagnosis and treatment. © 2011 Taylor & Francis.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142588
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.983
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.960
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, SMYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, MWYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYau, TKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYeung, RMWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T02:52:18Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-28T02:52:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPsychology And Health, 2011, v. 26 n. 3, p. 269-285en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0887-0446en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142588-
dc.description.abstractMany existing models posit that cognitive processing style is an important factor affecting self-perceived positive changes. In this study, the effects of explanatory style (the manner in which people cognitively process and explain why they experience good and bad events) on both posttraumatic growth (PTG) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms were examined among 90 Chinese women with breast cancer. It was found that explanatory style for good events, but not for bad events, was significantly associated with self-reported PTG. Women who attributed the causes of positive events to internal, global and stable factors tended to report more posttraumatic growth. In contrast, explanatory style for bad events, as opposed to good events, was significantly and positively correlated with PTSD symptoms. Among the three dimensions of explanatory style (internal, stable and global), the tendency to globalise the causes of good and bad events were the most important predictors of self-reported PTG and PTSD symptoms, respectively. While enhancing an optimistic explanatory style for bad events might reduce posttraumatic stress symptoms, cultivating an optimistic explanatory style for good events is likely to increase self-perceived positive changes after breast cancer diagnosis and treatment. © 2011 Taylor & Francis.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/08870446.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPsychology and Healthen_HK
dc.subjectCanceren_HK
dc.subjectExplanatory styleen_HK
dc.subjectPosttraumatic growthen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Psychological-
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group-
dc.subject.meshBreast Neoplasms - ethnology - psychology-
dc.subject.meshRationalization-
dc.subject.meshStress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - physiopathology - psychology-
dc.titleRelationships between explanatory style, posttraumatic growth and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms among Chinese breast cancer patientsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, SMY: munyin@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, SMY=rp00554en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/08870440903287926en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20204977-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79951815549en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros184570en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79951815549&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume26en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage269en_HK
dc.identifier.epage285en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000287491800002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, SMY=25722730500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, MWY=47461044200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYau, TK=7006540678en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeung, RMW=7102833329en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike8891192-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats