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Article: Moderate alcohol use and cognitive function in the guangzhou biobank cohort study

TitleModerate alcohol use and cognitive function in the guangzhou biobank cohort study
Authors
KeywordsAlcohol
Chinese
Cognition
Issue Date2010
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/annepidem
Citation
Annals Of Epidemiology, 2010, v. 20 n. 12, p. 873-882 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: Observational studies in Western settings show moderate alcohol use associated with better cognitive function, but they are vulnerable to contextual bias. Evidence from non-Western settings may be useful to verify causality. We examined such association in southern China where alcohol use is low. Methods: We used multivariable linear regression in cross-sectional data from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study to assess sex-stratified associations of alcohol use (never, occasional, moderate, heavy and former drinker) with delayed 10-word recall score for all 3 phases (N = 28,537) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score in phase 3 (N = 9,571). Results: Delayed 10-word recall scores were higher in moderate drinkers compared with never drinkers among men (0.30 words, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.18 to 0.42) but not women (0.02; 95% CI: -0.12 to 0.17), adjusted for sociodemographic factors. Occasional alcohol users also had higher 10-word recall scores among men (0.27; 95% CI: 0.18 to 0.37) and women (0.30; 95% CI: 0.23 to 0.37). These estimates were little altered by further adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors. Results for MMSE scores were similar. Conclusions: Alcohol may not drive the association between moderate use and better cognitive function, which instead may be due to confounding by general moderation in lifestyle. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142579
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.335
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.439
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong Foundation for Development and Research
University of Hong Kong University Research Committee Strategic Research Theme Public Health, Hong Kong
Guangzhou Public Health Bureau
Guangzhou Science and Technology Bureau, Guangzhou, China
University of Birmingham, UK
Funding Information:

The study was funded by The University of Hong Kong Foundation for Development and Research, and the University of Hong Kong University Research Committee Strategic Research Theme Public Health, Hong Kong; Guangzhou Public Health Bureau, and Guangzhou Science and Technology Bureau, Guangzhou, China; and The University of Birmingham, UK. The funding sources had no role in any of the following: study design; the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data; the writing of the report; and the decision to submit the paper for publication.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAu Yeung, SLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T02:51:48Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-28T02:51:48Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAnnals Of Epidemiology, 2010, v. 20 n. 12, p. 873-882en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1047-2797en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142579-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Observational studies in Western settings show moderate alcohol use associated with better cognitive function, but they are vulnerable to contextual bias. Evidence from non-Western settings may be useful to verify causality. We examined such association in southern China where alcohol use is low. Methods: We used multivariable linear regression in cross-sectional data from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study to assess sex-stratified associations of alcohol use (never, occasional, moderate, heavy and former drinker) with delayed 10-word recall score for all 3 phases (N = 28,537) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score in phase 3 (N = 9,571). Results: Delayed 10-word recall scores were higher in moderate drinkers compared with never drinkers among men (0.30 words, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.18 to 0.42) but not women (0.02; 95% CI: -0.12 to 0.17), adjusted for sociodemographic factors. Occasional alcohol users also had higher 10-word recall scores among men (0.27; 95% CI: 0.18 to 0.37) and women (0.30; 95% CI: 0.23 to 0.37). These estimates were little altered by further adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors. Results for MMSE scores were similar. Conclusions: Alcohol may not drive the association between moderate use and better cognitive function, which instead may be due to confounding by general moderation in lifestyle. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/annepidemen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of Epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subjectAlcoholen_HK
dc.subjectChineseen_HK
dc.subjectCognitionen_HK
dc.subject.meshAlcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology-
dc.subject.meshChina - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshCognition-
dc.subject.meshCohort Studies-
dc.subject.meshMental Recall-
dc.titleModerate alcohol use and cognitive function in the guangzhou biobank cohort studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM:gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM:cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.annepidem.2010.06.005en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20705480-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78149469034en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros184547en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78149469034&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume20en_HK
dc.identifier.issue12en_HK
dc.identifier.spage873en_HK
dc.identifier.epage882en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000284669000001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAu Yeung, SL=8871840600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, C=10639500500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, W=13410704100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, KK=7402997800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7817716-

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