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Article: Smoking cessation intervention practices in Chinese physicians: Do gender and smoking status matter?

TitleSmoking cessation intervention practices in Chinese physicians: Do gender and smoking status matter?
Authors
KeywordsAttitude
Chinese physicians
Education and practice
Knowledge
Practice
Smoking cessation intervention
Issue Date2011
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/ads.asp?ref=0966-0410
Citation
Health And Social Care In The Community, 2011, v. 19 n. 2, p. 126-137 How to Cite?
AbstractHealthcare settings provide a major arena for administering smoking cessation interventions. However, few studies have reported differences in the frequency of practice in healthcare professionals by gender and smoking status. This might also be influenced by a difference in smoking prevalence by gender, especially in China and other developing countries. This study examined factors associated with the frequency of cessation intervention practices by smoking status among Chinese physicians in men and women. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2006 in physicians with direct patient contact from nine hospitals in Guangzhou with a response rate of 60.8%. Significantly more female physicians who were non-smokers (79.7%) reported "initiation and/or advice" smoking cessation interventions than male physicians who were smokers (71.2%) and non-smokers (71.6%). Factors significantly associated with "initiation and/or advice" were prior smoking cessation training (OR=4.2, 95% CI 1.8-9.6) and lack of knowledge to help patients to quit (OR=0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.9) among male physicians who smoked; and organisational support (OR=1.7, 95% CI 1.3-2.2) and successful past experience (OR=0.4, 95% CI 0.2-1.0) among male physicians who did not smoke. Among female physicians who did not smoke, significant factors were agreeing that quitting smoking is the most cost-effective way to prevent chronic disease and cancer (OR=3.0, 95% CI 1.4-6.1), helping patients stop smoking is part of expected role and responsibility (OR=2.0, 95% CI 1.0-3.7), lack of knowledge to help patients to quit (OR=0.5, 95% CI 0.2-1.0) and organisational support (OR=1.3, 95% CI 1.0-1.6) for non-smoking female physicians. This study is the first to show that male physicians were less likely to provide smoking cessation counselling regardless of their smoking status while non-smoking female physicians were more active in advising patients on quitting. The findings highlight the need for developing tailored smoking cessation training programmes for physicians according to their smoking status and gender in China. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142574
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.557
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.790
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, YFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, SSCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T02:51:45Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-28T02:51:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHealth And Social Care In The Community, 2011, v. 19 n. 2, p. 126-137en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0966-0410en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142574-
dc.description.abstractHealthcare settings provide a major arena for administering smoking cessation interventions. However, few studies have reported differences in the frequency of practice in healthcare professionals by gender and smoking status. This might also be influenced by a difference in smoking prevalence by gender, especially in China and other developing countries. This study examined factors associated with the frequency of cessation intervention practices by smoking status among Chinese physicians in men and women. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2006 in physicians with direct patient contact from nine hospitals in Guangzhou with a response rate of 60.8%. Significantly more female physicians who were non-smokers (79.7%) reported "initiation and/or advice" smoking cessation interventions than male physicians who were smokers (71.2%) and non-smokers (71.6%). Factors significantly associated with "initiation and/or advice" were prior smoking cessation training (OR=4.2, 95% CI 1.8-9.6) and lack of knowledge to help patients to quit (OR=0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.9) among male physicians who smoked; and organisational support (OR=1.7, 95% CI 1.3-2.2) and successful past experience (OR=0.4, 95% CI 0.2-1.0) among male physicians who did not smoke. Among female physicians who did not smoke, significant factors were agreeing that quitting smoking is the most cost-effective way to prevent chronic disease and cancer (OR=3.0, 95% CI 1.4-6.1), helping patients stop smoking is part of expected role and responsibility (OR=2.0, 95% CI 1.0-3.7), lack of knowledge to help patients to quit (OR=0.5, 95% CI 0.2-1.0) and organisational support (OR=1.3, 95% CI 1.0-1.6) for non-smoking female physicians. This study is the first to show that male physicians were less likely to provide smoking cessation counselling regardless of their smoking status while non-smoking female physicians were more active in advising patients on quitting. The findings highlight the need for developing tailored smoking cessation training programmes for physicians according to their smoking status and gender in China. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/ads.asp?ref=0966-0410en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHealth and Social Care in the Communityen_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.com-
dc.subjectAttitudeen_HK
dc.subjectChinese physiciansen_HK
dc.subjectEducation and practiceen_HK
dc.subjectKnowledgeen_HK
dc.subjectPracticeen_HK
dc.subjectSmoking cessation interventionen_HK
dc.subject.meshAttitude of Health Personnel-
dc.subject.meshChina-
dc.subject.meshPhysicians - statistics and numerical data-
dc.subject.meshSmoking Cessation - statistics and numerical data-
dc.subject.meshTobacco Smoke Pollution-
dc.titleSmoking cessation intervention practices in Chinese physicians: Do gender and smoking status matter?en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, SSC: scsophia@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, SSC=rp00423en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2524.2010.00952.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21309876-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79751479405en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros184542en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79751479405&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume19en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage126en_HK
dc.identifier.epage137en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000287241100002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, C=10639500500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, YF=55464599900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, SSC=7404255378en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike8845573-

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