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Article: Chronic Pain and Psychiatric Morbidity: A Comparison between Patients Attending Specialist Orthopedics Clinic and Multidisciplinary Pain Clinic

TitleChronic Pain and Psychiatric Morbidity: A Comparison between Patients Attending Specialist Orthopedics Clinic and Multidisciplinary Pain Clinic
Authors
KeywordsAnxiety Disorders
Chinese
Chronic Pain
Depression
Psychiatric Morbidity
Issue Date2011
PublisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/PME
Citation
Pain Medicine, 2011, v. 12 n. 2, p. 246-259 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective. The objective of this study was to examine the associations between chronic pain and psychiatric morbidity using interview-based assessments of psychiatric symptomatology. We compared the prevalence of common mental disorder (CMD; consistent with neurotic and somatic symptoms, fatigue, and negative affect), depression, and anxiety disorder(s), and associated factors with these psychiatric illnesses among Chinese patients with chronic pain attending specialist orthopedics clinic and multidisciplinary pain clinic. Methods. A total of 370 patients with chronic pain were recruited from an Orthopedics Clinic (N=185) and a Pain Clinic (N=185) in Hong Kong. Psychiatric morbidity was assessed using the Revised Clinical Interview Schedule. Individual scores for neurotic symptoms and neurotic disorders (including depression and four types of anxiety disorders) were also calculated. Results. The reported lifetime prevalence rates of CMD were 35.3% and 75.3% for the Orthopedics and Pain Clinic samples, respectively. Rates of depression and anxiety disorders in the Pain Clinic (57.1% and 23.2%, respectively) were significantly higher than those in the Orthopedics sample (20.2% and 5.9%, respectively) (all P<0.001). Pain characteristics including number of pain sites, pain duration, pain intensity, and pain interference were all significantly associated with psychiatric morbidity after controlling for sociodemographic factors. Pain duration and litigation/compensation status consistently predicted concurrent pain intensity and disability. Conclusions. Chronic pain is associated with psychiatric morbidity. The higher rate of depression than anxiety disorder(s) among patients with chronic pain is consistent with previous studies that have found depression to be highly prevalent in chronic pain. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142571
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.324
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.869
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, WSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, PPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYap, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMak, KHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTam, BKHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFielding, Ren_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T02:51:44Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-28T02:51:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPain Medicine, 2011, v. 12 n. 2, p. 246-259en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1526-2375en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142571-
dc.description.abstractObjective. The objective of this study was to examine the associations between chronic pain and psychiatric morbidity using interview-based assessments of psychiatric symptomatology. We compared the prevalence of common mental disorder (CMD; consistent with neurotic and somatic symptoms, fatigue, and negative affect), depression, and anxiety disorder(s), and associated factors with these psychiatric illnesses among Chinese patients with chronic pain attending specialist orthopedics clinic and multidisciplinary pain clinic. Methods. A total of 370 patients with chronic pain were recruited from an Orthopedics Clinic (N=185) and a Pain Clinic (N=185) in Hong Kong. Psychiatric morbidity was assessed using the Revised Clinical Interview Schedule. Individual scores for neurotic symptoms and neurotic disorders (including depression and four types of anxiety disorders) were also calculated. Results. The reported lifetime prevalence rates of CMD were 35.3% and 75.3% for the Orthopedics and Pain Clinic samples, respectively. Rates of depression and anxiety disorders in the Pain Clinic (57.1% and 23.2%, respectively) were significantly higher than those in the Orthopedics sample (20.2% and 5.9%, respectively) (all P<0.001). Pain characteristics including number of pain sites, pain duration, pain intensity, and pain interference were all significantly associated with psychiatric morbidity after controlling for sociodemographic factors. Pain duration and litigation/compensation status consistently predicted concurrent pain intensity and disability. Conclusions. Chronic pain is associated with psychiatric morbidity. The higher rate of depression than anxiety disorder(s) among patients with chronic pain is consistent with previous studies that have found depression to be highly prevalent in chronic pain. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/PMEen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPain Medicineen_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.subjectAnxiety Disordersen_HK
dc.subjectChineseen_HK
dc.subjectChronic Painen_HK
dc.subjectDepressionen_HK
dc.subjectPsychiatric Morbidityen_HK
dc.subject.meshAmbulatory Care Facilities-
dc.subject.meshChronic Disease - psychology-
dc.subject.meshOrthopedics-
dc.subject.meshPain - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology-
dc.subject.meshPain Clinics-
dc.titleChronic Pain and Psychiatric Morbidity: A Comparison between Patients Attending Specialist Orthopedics Clinic and Multidisciplinary Pain Clinicen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailFielding, R:fielding@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFielding, R=rp00339en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1526-4637.2010.01044.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21266005-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79751526572en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros184473en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79751526572&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume12en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage246en_HK
dc.identifier.epage259en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000287200000009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, WS=7403972073en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, PP=7408353738en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYap, J=7007107499en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMak, KH=12768176000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTam, BKH=36174749700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFielding, R=7102200484en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike8839895-

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