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Article: Cholesterol, diabetes and major cardiovascular diseases in the Asia Pacific region

TitleCholesterol, diabetes and major cardiovascular diseases in the Asia Pacific region
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00125/index.htm
Citation
Diabetologia, 2007, v. 50 n. 11, p. 2289-2297 How to Cite?
AbstractAIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to assess the association between total cholesterol and major cardiovascular diseases among persons with and without diabetes in the Asia-Pacific region. METHODS: We used data on individual participants in 30 cohort studies from the Asia-Pacific region to compute the hazards ratios and 95% CIs for participants with and without diabetes at baseline, using Cox proportional models. Analyses were stratified by sex and region (Asia vs Australia or New Zealand) and adjusted for age. Repeat measurements of total cholesterol were used to adjust for regression dilution bias. RESULTS: The analysis included 333,533 individuals (6.3% with diabetes at baseline) who experienced 6,074 fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events over a median follow-up period of 4.0 years. Total cholesterol was positively associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) and ischaemic stroke, and negatively with haemorrhagic stroke in a continuous, log-linear fashion, similarly among participants with and without diabetes. Each 1 mmol/l increase above the 'usual' level for total cholesterol was associated with a 41% (95% CI 23-63%) and 42% (95% CI 35-50%) greater risk of CHD among participants with and without diabetes. The corresponding values for ischaemic stroke were 23% (95% CI 0-52%) and 31% (95% CI 20-44%), respectively. These results were broadly consistent for sex, age and region. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Total cholesterol is associated with similarly increased risks of cardiovascular events in people with and without diabetes. While abnormal levels of other lipid fractions are frequently observed in people with diabetes, these data support aggressive lowering of total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels for prevention of cardiovascular events.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142567
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.206
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.528
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKengne, APen_US
dc.contributor.authorPatel, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorBarzi, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorJamrozik, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_US
dc.contributor.authorUeshima, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorOhkubo, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorFang, XHen_US
dc.contributor.authorKim, HCen_US
dc.contributor.authorWoodward, Men_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T02:51:42Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-28T02:51:42Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationDiabetologia, 2007, v. 50 n. 11, p. 2289-2297en_US
dc.identifier.issn0012-186X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142567-
dc.description.abstractAIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to assess the association between total cholesterol and major cardiovascular diseases among persons with and without diabetes in the Asia-Pacific region. METHODS: We used data on individual participants in 30 cohort studies from the Asia-Pacific region to compute the hazards ratios and 95% CIs for participants with and without diabetes at baseline, using Cox proportional models. Analyses were stratified by sex and region (Asia vs Australia or New Zealand) and adjusted for age. Repeat measurements of total cholesterol were used to adjust for regression dilution bias. RESULTS: The analysis included 333,533 individuals (6.3% with diabetes at baseline) who experienced 6,074 fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events over a median follow-up period of 4.0 years. Total cholesterol was positively associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) and ischaemic stroke, and negatively with haemorrhagic stroke in a continuous, log-linear fashion, similarly among participants with and without diabetes. Each 1 mmol/l increase above the 'usual' level for total cholesterol was associated with a 41% (95% CI 23-63%) and 42% (95% CI 35-50%) greater risk of CHD among participants with and without diabetes. The corresponding values for ischaemic stroke were 23% (95% CI 0-52%) and 31% (95% CI 20-44%), respectively. These results were broadly consistent for sex, age and region. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Total cholesterol is associated with similarly increased risks of cardiovascular events in people with and without diabetes. While abnormal levels of other lipid fractions are frequently observed in people with diabetes, these data support aggressive lowering of total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels for prevention of cardiovascular events.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00125/index.htm-
dc.relation.ispartofDiabetologiaen_US
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.com-
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshCholesterol - blood-
dc.subject.meshCoronary Disease - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshDiabetic Angiopathies - epidemiology-
dc.titleCholesterol, diabetes and major cardiovascular diseases in the Asia Pacific regionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0012-186X&volume=50&issue=11&spage=2289&epage=2297&date=2007&atitle=Cholesterol,+diabetes+and+major+cardiovascular+diseases+in+the+Asia+Pacific+region-
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00125-007-0801-2-
dc.identifier.pmid17909878-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34848908755-
dc.identifier.hkuros184449en_US
dc.identifier.volume50en_US
dc.identifier.issue11en_US
dc.identifier.spage2289en_US
dc.identifier.epage2297en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000249917200010-
dc.identifier.citeulike8363970-

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