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Article: Monday blues of deceased-donor liver transplantation
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TitleMonday blues of deceased-donor liver transplantation
 
AuthorsChan, SC1
Dai, WC1
Lo, CM1
Lam, B1
Kwan, YM1
Ho, WY1
Fan, ST1
 
KeywordsDeceased-donor
Graft shortage
Liver transplantation
Organ donation
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherThe First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hbpdint.com/
 
CitationHepatobiliary And Pancreatic Diseases International, 2011, v. 10 n. 1, p. 26-29 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractBACKGROUND: There is a constant and global shortage of deceased-donor organs for transplantation. Ways to identify areas for securing potential deceased-donor organs may improve the supply and hence benefit more patients in need of transplantation. METHODS: We looked into the disparity of the number of deceased-donor liver transplantation (DDLT) performed at our hospital on different days of the weeks from January 2000 to the end of December 2009 (237 DDLTs). The number of DDLT performed on each day was compared with the other days of the week. RESULTS: It was apparent that there were fewer DDLTs on Mondays, as shown by the numbers of DDLT performed on different days of the week in an ascending order: Monday 18 (7.6%), Sunday 30 (12.7%), Thursday 34 (14.3%), Friday 36 (15.2%), Wednesday 38 (16.0%), Tuesday 40 (16.9%), and Saturday 41 (17.3%). The difference reached statistical significance when Monday was compared with Tuesday (P=0.019), Wednesday (P=0.010), Friday (P=0.021), and Saturday (P=0.007). It was twice as unlikely a DDLT would be performed on Monday as compared with other days. Such a trend did not change even with an increase in the number of deceased-donor liver grafts in the last year. As consent to donation was obtained from the donor family the day before DDLT, fewer consents were thus obtained on Sundays. CONCLUSION: These findings suggested that deceased-donor organ donation activities were less active on Sundays and could be improved. This further raises the concern of possible wastage of potential cases of organ donation. © 2011, Hepatobiliary Pancreat Dis Int. All rights reserved.
 
ISSN1499-3872
2012 Impact Factor: 1.259
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.420
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000286791200003
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorChan, SC
 
dc.contributor.authorDai, WC
 
dc.contributor.authorLo, CM
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, B
 
dc.contributor.authorKwan, YM
 
dc.contributor.authorHo, WY
 
dc.contributor.authorFan, ST
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T02:50:41Z
 
dc.date.available2011-10-28T02:50:41Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: There is a constant and global shortage of deceased-donor organs for transplantation. Ways to identify areas for securing potential deceased-donor organs may improve the supply and hence benefit more patients in need of transplantation. METHODS: We looked into the disparity of the number of deceased-donor liver transplantation (DDLT) performed at our hospital on different days of the weeks from January 2000 to the end of December 2009 (237 DDLTs). The number of DDLT performed on each day was compared with the other days of the week. RESULTS: It was apparent that there were fewer DDLTs on Mondays, as shown by the numbers of DDLT performed on different days of the week in an ascending order: Monday 18 (7.6%), Sunday 30 (12.7%), Thursday 34 (14.3%), Friday 36 (15.2%), Wednesday 38 (16.0%), Tuesday 40 (16.9%), and Saturday 41 (17.3%). The difference reached statistical significance when Monday was compared with Tuesday (P=0.019), Wednesday (P=0.010), Friday (P=0.021), and Saturday (P=0.007). It was twice as unlikely a DDLT would be performed on Monday as compared with other days. Such a trend did not change even with an increase in the number of deceased-donor liver grafts in the last year. As consent to donation was obtained from the donor family the day before DDLT, fewer consents were thus obtained on Sundays. CONCLUSION: These findings suggested that deceased-donor organ donation activities were less active on Sundays and could be improved. This further raises the concern of possible wastage of potential cases of organ donation. © 2011, Hepatobiliary Pancreat Dis Int. All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationHepatobiliary And Pancreatic Diseases International, 2011, v. 10 n. 1, p. 26-29 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage29
 
dc.identifier.hkuros184616
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000286791200003
 
dc.identifier.issn1499-3872
2012 Impact Factor: 1.259
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.420
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.pmid21269931
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79952050634
 
dc.identifier.spage26
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142535
 
dc.identifier.volume10
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherThe First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hbpdint.com/
 
dc.publisher.placeChina
 
dc.relation.ispartofHepatobiliary and Pancreatic Diseases International
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshLiver Transplantation - statistics and numerical data
 
dc.subject.meshTime Factors
 
dc.subject.meshTissue Donors - supply and distribution
 
dc.subject.meshTissue and Organ Procurement - statistics and numerical data
 
dc.subjectDeceased-donor
 
dc.subjectGraft shortage
 
dc.subjectLiver transplantation
 
dc.subjectOrgan donation
 
dc.titleMonday blues of deceased-donor liver transplantation
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Dai, WC</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lo, CM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lam, B</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Kwan, YM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ho, WY</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Fan, ST</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong