File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: The changing role of pectoralis major flap in head and neck reconstruction

TitleThe changing role of pectoralis major flap in head and neck reconstruction
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherSpringer Verlag.
Citation
European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, 2010, v. 267 n. 11, p. 1759-1763 How to Cite?
AbstractAlthough pectoralis major flap (PM flap) has been used as the workhorse flap in head and neck reconstruction, its use in head and neck defects seems to fall out of favour in the era of free tissue transfer. The aim of this review is to find out the role of PM flap in modern head and neck surgery. Medical records of patients who underwent PM flap reconstruction for head and neck defect in our division were reviewed. The age, gender, flap type, indication and complication rate were described. Between January 1998 and December 2008, 202 PM flaps were used for head and neck reconstruction in 192 patients. In the early study period (1998-June 2003), out of the 119 PM flap reconstructions, 106 (89%) were performed for immediate reconstruction after resection of head and neck tumour, while 10 (8%) were performed as salvage procedures for complication after tumour resection e.g. failure of free flap, pharyngocutaneous fistula. In the late study period (July 2003-2008), out of the 83 PM flap reconstructions, 58 (70%) were performed for immediate reconstruction, while 24 (29%) were performed as salvage procedures. For immediate reconstruction after tumour extirpation, 51 flaps (48%) were performed for reconstruction of the tongue in the early study period, while only 14 (24%) were performed in the late study period. The number of PM flap used for immediate reconstruction for other head and neck defects remained relatively static throughout the two study periods. Over the study period, there were 10 (5%) cases of partial flap necrosis and 2 (1%) total flap loss, making the overall flap necrosis rate 6%. In the era of free tissue transfer, the role of PM flap in head and neck surgery has shifted from immediate reconstruction to salvage operation. However, PM flap still has an unique role in the repair of certain head and neck defects.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142527
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.627
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.755
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiu, HLen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, JYWen_US
dc.contributor.authorWei, WIen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T02:50:30Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-28T02:50:30Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, 2010, v. 267 n. 11, p. 1759-1763en_US
dc.identifier.issn0937-4477-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142527-
dc.description.abstractAlthough pectoralis major flap (PM flap) has been used as the workhorse flap in head and neck reconstruction, its use in head and neck defects seems to fall out of favour in the era of free tissue transfer. The aim of this review is to find out the role of PM flap in modern head and neck surgery. Medical records of patients who underwent PM flap reconstruction for head and neck defect in our division were reviewed. The age, gender, flap type, indication and complication rate were described. Between January 1998 and December 2008, 202 PM flaps were used for head and neck reconstruction in 192 patients. In the early study period (1998-June 2003), out of the 119 PM flap reconstructions, 106 (89%) were performed for immediate reconstruction after resection of head and neck tumour, while 10 (8%) were performed as salvage procedures for complication after tumour resection e.g. failure of free flap, pharyngocutaneous fistula. In the late study period (July 2003-2008), out of the 83 PM flap reconstructions, 58 (70%) were performed for immediate reconstruction, while 24 (29%) were performed as salvage procedures. For immediate reconstruction after tumour extirpation, 51 flaps (48%) were performed for reconstruction of the tongue in the early study period, while only 14 (24%) were performed in the late study period. The number of PM flap used for immediate reconstruction for other head and neck defects remained relatively static throughout the two study periods. Over the study period, there were 10 (5%) cases of partial flap necrosis and 2 (1%) total flap loss, making the overall flap necrosis rate 6%. In the era of free tissue transfer, the role of PM flap in head and neck surgery has shifted from immediate reconstruction to salvage operation. However, PM flap still has an unique role in the repair of certain head and neck defects.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag.-
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngologyen_US
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.com-
dc.subject.meshHead and Neck Neoplasms - surgery-
dc.subject.meshPectoralis Muscles - transplantation-
dc.subject.meshReconstructive Surgical Procedures - methods-
dc.subject.meshSurgical Flaps-
dc.subject.meshSkin Transplantation-
dc.titleThe changing role of pectoralis major flap in head and neck reconstructionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWei, WI: hrmswwi@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWei, WI=rp00323en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00405-010-1271-6-
dc.identifier.pmid20461392-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79952197278-
dc.identifier.hkuros184420en_US
dc.identifier.volume267en_US
dc.identifier.issue11en_US
dc.identifier.spage1759en_US
dc.identifier.epage1763en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000282213900016-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, HL=35318009800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, JY=27171772200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWei, WI=7403321552en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats