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Article: Electrically Guiding Migration of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

TitleElectrically Guiding Migration of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells
Authors
KeywordsCell migration
Electric field (EF)
Galvanotaxis
Human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cell
Wound healing
Issue Date2011
PublisherHumana Press, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/humana+press/molecular%2C+cell+and+stem+cell+biology/journal/12015
Citation
Stem Cell Reviews And Reports, 2011, v. 7 n. 4, p. 987-996 How to Cite?
AbstractA major road-block in stem cell therapy is the poor homing and integration of transplanted stem cells with the targeted host tissue. Human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cells are considered an excellent alternative to embryonic stem (ES) cells and we tested the feasibility of using small, physiological electric fields (EFs) to guide hiPS cells to their target. Applied EFs stimulated and guided migration of cultured hiPS cells toward the anode, with a stimulation threshold of <30 mV/mm; in three-dimensional (3D) culture hiPS cells remained stationary, whereas in an applied EF they migrated directionally. This is of significance as the therapeutic use of hiPS cells occurs in a 3D environment. EF exposure did not alter expression of the pluripotency markers SSEA-4 and Oct-4 in hiPS cells. We compared EF-directed migration (galvanotaxis) of hiPS cells and hES cells and found that hiPS cells showed greater sensitivity and directedness than those of hES cells in an EF, while hES cells migrated toward cathode. Rho-kinase (ROCK) inhibition, a method to aid expansion and survival of stem cells, significantly increased the motility, but reduced directionality of iPS cells in an EF by 70-80%. Thus, our study has revealed that physiological EF is an effective guidance cue for the migration of hiPS cells in either 2D or 3D environments and that will occur in a ROCK-dependent manner. Our current finding may lead to techniques for applying EFs in vivo to guide migration of transplanted stem cells. © 2011 The Author(s).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142401
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.111
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.424
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
California Institute of Regenerative MedicineRB1-01417
NIH1R01EY019101
RO1 NS059043
RO1 ES015988
NSFMCB-0951199
UC Davis
National Multiple Sclerosis Society
Feldstein Medical Foundation
Shriners Hospitals for Children
Funding Information:

This work is supported by a grant from the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine RB1-01417 (toMZ). MZ is also supported by NIH 1R01EY019101, NSF MCB-0951199, and the UC Davis Dermatology Developmental Fund. WD is in part supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health (RO1 NS059043 and RO1 ES015988), National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Feldstein Medical Foundation, and Shriners Hospitals for Children. We thank James Thomson for providing iPS cells and Jan Nolta for her advice and support. We also thank Bing Song for sharing technical expertise, and other members from the Zhao, Deng to Li labs for their help.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCalafiore, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorZeng, Qen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Xen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, RAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDeng, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Men_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T02:45:09Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-28T02:45:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationStem Cell Reviews And Reports, 2011, v. 7 n. 4, p. 987-996en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1550-8943en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142401-
dc.description.abstractA major road-block in stem cell therapy is the poor homing and integration of transplanted stem cells with the targeted host tissue. Human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cells are considered an excellent alternative to embryonic stem (ES) cells and we tested the feasibility of using small, physiological electric fields (EFs) to guide hiPS cells to their target. Applied EFs stimulated and guided migration of cultured hiPS cells toward the anode, with a stimulation threshold of <30 mV/mm; in three-dimensional (3D) culture hiPS cells remained stationary, whereas in an applied EF they migrated directionally. This is of significance as the therapeutic use of hiPS cells occurs in a 3D environment. EF exposure did not alter expression of the pluripotency markers SSEA-4 and Oct-4 in hiPS cells. We compared EF-directed migration (galvanotaxis) of hiPS cells and hES cells and found that hiPS cells showed greater sensitivity and directedness than those of hES cells in an EF, while hES cells migrated toward cathode. Rho-kinase (ROCK) inhibition, a method to aid expansion and survival of stem cells, significantly increased the motility, but reduced directionality of iPS cells in an EF by 70-80%. Thus, our study has revealed that physiological EF is an effective guidance cue for the migration of hiPS cells in either 2D or 3D environments and that will occur in a ROCK-dependent manner. Our current finding may lead to techniques for applying EFs in vivo to guide migration of transplanted stem cells. © 2011 The Author(s).en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHumana Press, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/humana+press/molecular%2C+cell+and+stem+cell+biology/journal/12015en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofStem Cell Reviews and Reportsen_HK
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.comen_US
dc.subjectCell migrationen_HK
dc.subjectElectric field (EF)en_HK
dc.subjectGalvanotaxisen_HK
dc.subjectHuman induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cellen_HK
dc.subjectWound healingen_HK
dc.titleElectrically Guiding Migration of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cellsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1550-8943&volume=&spage=&epage=&date=2011&atitle=Electrically+Guiding+Migration+of+Human+Induced+Pluripotent+Stem+Cellsen_US
dc.identifier.emailLi, RA:ronaldli@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, RA=rp01352en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12015-011-9247-5en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21373881-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3226697-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-82355171758en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros197120en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-82355171758&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume7en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage987en_HK
dc.identifier.epage996en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000297597800020-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, J=16308540200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCalafiore, M=8571101200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZeng, Q=7401806821en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, X=7410285684en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHuang, Y=7501571848en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, RA=7404724466en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDeng, W=7202223503en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhao, M=10639168800en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike8977742-

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