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Article: Light deprivation induces depression-like behavior and suppresses neurogenesis in diurnal Mongolian gerbil (meriones unguiculatus)

TitleLight deprivation induces depression-like behavior and suppresses neurogenesis in diurnal Mongolian gerbil (meriones unguiculatus)
Authors
KeywordsDiurnal
Hippocampus
Light deprivation
Mongolian gerbil
Neurogenesis
Seasonal affective disorder (SAD)
Subventricular zone
Issue Date2011
PublisherCognizant Communication Corp.
Citation
Cell Transplantation, 2011, v. 20 n. 6, p. 871-881 How to Cite?
AbstractRecent evidence suggests that adult neurogenesis contributes to the pathophysiology of different psychiatric disorders, including depressive disorder, anxiety disorder, and schizophrenia. Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a specific form of recurrent depressive disorder that can be induced by shortened light period. It is unclear yet whether neurogenesis is affected in SAD or under altered light/dark cycle. The present study aims at examining whether neurogenesis and dendritic growth of immature neurons are affected in Mongolian gerbils, a mainly diurnal rodent, under light deprivation. Animals were divided into two groups: the control (kept in 12 h light:12 h dark) and the light-deprived groups (kept in 24 h dark). Depression-like behaviors and neurogenesis were assessed after 2 weeks. Compared with the control group, light-deprived gerbils showed increased immobile time in the tail suspension test and forced swimming test, which indicates induction of depression-like behavior. Cell proliferation in both the hippocampal and subventricular zone were significantly decreased in the light-deprived group, which also showed a decreased neuronal differentiation. Dendritic maturation of immature neurons was suppressed by light deprivation, which is revealed by doublecortin staining and Sholl analysis. The results revealed that the light/dark cycle exerts impacts on neurogenesis and maturation of new neurons. Additionally, the current experiment may offer a model for exploring the relationship among daylight exposure, circadian cycles, depressive behavior, and the underlying mechanisms. © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142320
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.427
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.161
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Science foundation of China663031
Ministry of Science and Technology of China2007AA02Z146
2009CB320900
NSFC/RGCN_HKU750/08
Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities21609101
National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program)2011CB707501
Funding Information:

This work was supported by National Science foundation of China grants (663031 to M.P.); Ministry of Science and Technology of China grants (2007AA02Z146 & 2009CB320900 to M.P.); NSFC/RGC Joint Research Scheme under the contract N_HKU750/08 (K.F.S.); the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (21609101, K.F.S.); and National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (2011CB707501, K.F.S.).

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLau, BWMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRen, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYang, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYan, SWLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChang, RCCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPu, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorSo, KFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T02:42:49Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-28T02:42:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationCell Transplantation, 2011, v. 20 n. 6, p. 871-881en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0963-6897en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142320-
dc.description.abstractRecent evidence suggests that adult neurogenesis contributes to the pathophysiology of different psychiatric disorders, including depressive disorder, anxiety disorder, and schizophrenia. Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a specific form of recurrent depressive disorder that can be induced by shortened light period. It is unclear yet whether neurogenesis is affected in SAD or under altered light/dark cycle. The present study aims at examining whether neurogenesis and dendritic growth of immature neurons are affected in Mongolian gerbils, a mainly diurnal rodent, under light deprivation. Animals were divided into two groups: the control (kept in 12 h light:12 h dark) and the light-deprived groups (kept in 24 h dark). Depression-like behaviors and neurogenesis were assessed after 2 weeks. Compared with the control group, light-deprived gerbils showed increased immobile time in the tail suspension test and forced swimming test, which indicates induction of depression-like behavior. Cell proliferation in both the hippocampal and subventricular zone were significantly decreased in the light-deprived group, which also showed a decreased neuronal differentiation. Dendritic maturation of immature neurons was suppressed by light deprivation, which is revealed by doublecortin staining and Sholl analysis. The results revealed that the light/dark cycle exerts impacts on neurogenesis and maturation of new neurons. Additionally, the current experiment may offer a model for exploring the relationship among daylight exposure, circadian cycles, depressive behavior, and the underlying mechanisms. © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCognizant Communication Corp.-
dc.relation.ispartofCell Transplantationen_HK
dc.rightsCell Transplantation. Copyright © Cognizant Communication Corp.-
dc.subjectDiurnalen_HK
dc.subjectHippocampusen_HK
dc.subjectLight deprivationen_HK
dc.subjectMongolian gerbilen_HK
dc.subjectNeurogenesisen_HK
dc.subjectSeasonal affective disorder (SAD)en_HK
dc.subjectSubventricular zoneen_HK
dc.subject.meshBehavior, Animal-
dc.subject.meshCell Proliferation-
dc.subject.meshDarkness - adverse effects-
dc.subject.meshNeurogenesis-
dc.subject.meshSeasonal Affective Disorder - metabolism - pathology-
dc.titleLight deprivation induces depression-like behavior and suppresses neurogenesis in diurnal Mongolian gerbil (meriones unguiculatus)en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChang, RCC:rccchang@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSo, KF:hrmaskf@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChang, RCC=rp00470en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySo, KF=rp00329en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.3727/096368910X539065en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21054936-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80051722294en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros197677en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80051722294&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume20en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage871en_HK
dc.identifier.epage881en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000294095600007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, BWM=21934562200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRen, C=38862708400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, J=49862555100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYan, SWL=49862496300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChang, RCC=7403713410en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPu, M=16073321400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSo, KF=34668391300en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9685826-

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