File Download
 
Links for fulltext
(May Require Subscription)
 
Supplementary

Article: Clinical and socio-demographic factors influencing the oral health-related quality of life of Chinese elders
  • Basic View
  • Metadata View
  • XML View
TitleClinical and socio-demographic factors influencing the oral health-related quality of life of Chinese elders
 
AuthorsZhao, L2
Lin, HC2
Lo, ECM1
Wong, MCM1
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherF D I World Dental Press Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.fdiworldental.org/resources/4_3community.html
 
CitationCommunity Dental Health, 2011, v. 28 n. 3, p. 206-210 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1922/CDH_2574Lin05
 
AbstractObjectives: The objective of this study was to explore the clinical and socio-demographic factors influencing oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) of the Chinese elderly. Methods: Two urban districts in Binzhou, Shandong Province, Eastern China were selected and 300 elders aged 60-80 years were recruited. The study subjects completed a structured questionnaire in an interview and underwent a clinical examination. The questionnaire included questions on socio-economic information and a Putonghua version of the General Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI) which had been validated for use in Chinese elders to evaluate their OHRQoL. Clinical examination was performed using the criteria recommended by the World Health Organization. Tooth status, periodontal health status, loss of attachment (LOA), and number of occluding tooth pairs were recorded. Duplicate examinations were conducted on 10% of the subjects. Results: The mean GOHAI score of the subjects was 46.0 (SD 8.5). Result of an ANCOVA showed that subjects who were older, had no root caries, had no tooth with LOA≥6mm, or had more occluding pairs had higher GOHAI scores indicating better OHRQoL. Conclusion: The OHRQoL of the study elders was fair and was influenced by age and a number of clinical factors. With limited resources and dental manpower in China, higher priority should be given to the elders who are relatively younger, who have or are at high risk of developing root caries and advanced periodontal diseases, and who have few occluding tooth pairs. © BASCD 2011.
 
ISSN0265-539X
2013 Impact Factor: 0.871
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.471
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1922/CDH_2574Lin05
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000297933700005
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorZhao, L
 
dc.contributor.authorLin, HC
 
dc.contributor.authorLo, ECM
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, MCM
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T02:42:12Z
 
dc.date.available2011-10-28T02:42:12Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractObjectives: The objective of this study was to explore the clinical and socio-demographic factors influencing oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) of the Chinese elderly. Methods: Two urban districts in Binzhou, Shandong Province, Eastern China were selected and 300 elders aged 60-80 years were recruited. The study subjects completed a structured questionnaire in an interview and underwent a clinical examination. The questionnaire included questions on socio-economic information and a Putonghua version of the General Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI) which had been validated for use in Chinese elders to evaluate their OHRQoL. Clinical examination was performed using the criteria recommended by the World Health Organization. Tooth status, periodontal health status, loss of attachment (LOA), and number of occluding tooth pairs were recorded. Duplicate examinations were conducted on 10% of the subjects. Results: The mean GOHAI score of the subjects was 46.0 (SD 8.5). Result of an ANCOVA showed that subjects who were older, had no root caries, had no tooth with LOA≥6mm, or had more occluding pairs had higher GOHAI scores indicating better OHRQoL. Conclusion: The OHRQoL of the study elders was fair and was influenced by age and a number of clinical factors. With limited resources and dental manpower in China, higher priority should be given to the elders who are relatively younger, who have or are at high risk of developing root caries and advanced periodontal diseases, and who have few occluding tooth pairs. © BASCD 2011.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationCommunity Dental Health, 2011, v. 28 n. 3, p. 206-210 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1922/CDH_2574Lin05
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1922/CDH_2574Lin05
 
dc.identifier.epage210
 
dc.identifier.hkuros197653
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000297933700005
 
dc.identifier.issn0265-539X
2013 Impact Factor: 0.871
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.471
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.pmid21916355
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80052662370
 
dc.identifier.spage206
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142294
 
dc.identifier.volume28
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherF D I World Dental Press Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.fdiworldental.org/resources/4_3community.html
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofCommunity Dental Health
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAged
 
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and over
 
dc.subject.meshAnalysis of Variance
 
dc.subject.meshChina - epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshDMF Index
 
dc.subject.meshDental Care for Aged
 
dc.subject.meshEducational Status
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshHealth Priorities
 
dc.subject.meshHealth Status Indicators
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshIncome
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshOral Health
 
dc.subject.meshPeriodontal Attachment Loss - epidemiology - psychology
 
dc.subject.meshQuality of Life
 
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires
 
dc.subject.meshRoot Caries - epidemiology - psychology
 
dc.subject.meshStatistics, Nonparametric
 
dc.subject.meshTooth Loss - epidemiology - psychology
 
dc.subject.meshUrban Population
 
dc.titleClinical and socio-demographic factors influencing the oral health-related quality of life of Chinese elders
 
dc.typeArticle
 
<?xml encoding="utf-8" version="1.0"?>
<item><contributor.author>Zhao, L</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lin, HC</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lo, ECM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wong, MCM</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2011-10-28T02:42:12Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2011-10-28T02:42:12Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2011</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>Community Dental Health, 2011, v. 28 n. 3, p. 206-210</identifier.citation>
<identifier.issn>0265-539X</identifier.issn>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/142294</identifier.uri>
<description.abstract>Objectives: The objective of this study was to explore the clinical and socio-demographic factors influencing oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) of the Chinese elderly. Methods: Two urban districts in Binzhou, Shandong Province, Eastern China were selected and 300 elders aged 60-80 years were recruited. The study subjects completed a structured questionnaire in an interview and underwent a clinical examination. The questionnaire included questions on socio-economic information and a Putonghua version of the General Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI) which had been validated for use in Chinese elders to evaluate their OHRQoL. Clinical examination was performed using the criteria recommended by the World Health Organization. Tooth status, periodontal health status, loss of attachment (LOA), and number of occluding tooth pairs were recorded. Duplicate examinations were conducted on 10% of the subjects. Results: The mean GOHAI score of the subjects was 46.0 (SD 8.5). Result of an ANCOVA showed that subjects who were older, had no root caries, had no tooth with LOA&#8805;6mm, or had more occluding pairs had higher GOHAI scores indicating better OHRQoL. Conclusion: The OHRQoL of the study elders was fair and was influenced by age and a number of clinical factors. With limited resources and dental manpower in China, higher priority should be given to the elders who are relatively younger, who have or are at high risk of developing root caries and advanced periodontal diseases, and who have few occluding tooth pairs. &#169; BASCD 2011.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>F D I World Dental Press Ltd. The Journal&apos;s web site is located at http://www.fdiworldental.org/resources/4_3community.html</publisher>
<relation.ispartof>Community Dental Health</relation.ispartof>
<subject.mesh>Aged</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Aged, 80 and over</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Analysis of Variance</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>China - epidemiology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>DMF Index</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Dental Care for Aged</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Educational Status</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Female</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Health Priorities</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Health Status Indicators</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Humans</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Income</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Male</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Middle Aged</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Oral Health</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Periodontal Attachment Loss - epidemiology - psychology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Quality of Life</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Questionnaires</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Root Caries - epidemiology - psychology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Statistics, Nonparametric</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Tooth Loss - epidemiology - psychology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Urban Population</subject.mesh>
<title>Clinical and socio-demographic factors influencing the oral health-related quality of life of Chinese elders</title>
<type>Article</type>
<description.nature>Link_to_subscribed_fulltext</description.nature>
<identifier.doi>10.1922/CDH_2574Lin05</identifier.doi>
<identifier.pmid>21916355</identifier.pmid>
<identifier.scopus>eid_2-s2.0-80052662370</identifier.scopus>
<identifier.hkuros>197653</identifier.hkuros>
<relation.references>http://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80052662370&amp;selection=ref&amp;src=s&amp;origin=recordpage</relation.references>
<identifier.volume>28</identifier.volume>
<identifier.issue>3</identifier.issue>
<identifier.spage>206</identifier.spage>
<identifier.epage>210</identifier.epage>
<identifier.isi>WOS:000297933700005</identifier.isi>
<publisher.place>United Kingdom</publisher.place>
</item>
Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Sun Yat-Sen University