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Article: Building a Chinese Medicine Sector in Hong Kong

TitleBuilding a Chinese Medicine Sector in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherDepartment of Politics and Public Administration, University of Hong Kong.
Citation
The Asian Journal of Public Administration, 2003, v. 25 n. 2, p. 267-286 How to Cite?
AbstractIn the past 10-15 years, policy makers in Hong Kong have started to turn their attention to Chinese medicine. This article reviews their progress to date, and examines the different regional policy models they might learn from in framing health care policies to cover both Chinese and modern scientific medicine. It argues that the best way forward for Hong Kong is to position itself on a spectrum of nondiscriminatory state practice that offers equal respect to both traditional and modern medicines. In East Asia, China stands towards one end of this spectrum, and South Korea and Taiwan towards the other. The article holds that Hong Kong should place itself somewhere between the two.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141989
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFan, R-
dc.contributor.authorHolliday, I-
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-04T08:23:54Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-04T08:23:54Z-
dc.date.issued2003-
dc.identifier.citationThe Asian Journal of Public Administration, 2003, v. 25 n. 2, p. 267-286-
dc.identifier.issn0259-8272-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141989-
dc.description.abstractIn the past 10-15 years, policy makers in Hong Kong have started to turn their attention to Chinese medicine. This article reviews their progress to date, and examines the different regional policy models they might learn from in framing health care policies to cover both Chinese and modern scientific medicine. It argues that the best way forward for Hong Kong is to position itself on a spectrum of nondiscriminatory state practice that offers equal respect to both traditional and modern medicines. In East Asia, China stands towards one end of this spectrum, and South Korea and Taiwan towards the other. The article holds that Hong Kong should place itself somewhere between the two.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherDepartment of Politics and Public Administration, University of Hong Kong.-
dc.relation.ispartofThe Asian Journal of Public Administration-
dc.titleBuilding a Chinese Medicine Sector in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0259-8272&volume=25&issue=2&spage=267&epage=286&date=2003&atitle=Building+a+Chinese+Medicine+Sector+in+Hong+Kong-
dc.identifier.emailHolliday, I: ian.holliday@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.volume25-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage267-
dc.identifier.epage286-

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