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Article: The effects of neuregulin1 on brain function in controls and patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

TitleThe effects of neuregulin1 on brain function in controls and patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder
Authors
KeywordsBipolar disorder
Functional magnetic resonance imaging
Genetics
Neuregulin1
Schizophrenia
Verbal fluency
Issue Date2008
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ynimg
Citation
Neuroimage, 2008, v. 42 n. 2, p. 817-826 How to Cite?
AbstractRecent studies have identified neuregulin1 as a probable susceptibility gene for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. However, little is known about how this gene may affect brain function to increase vulnerability to these disorders. The present investigation examined the impact of neuregulin1 genotype on brain function in patients with schizophrenia, patients with bipolar I disorder and healthy volunteers. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure brain responses during a verbal fluency task in a total of 115 subjects comprising 41 patients with schizophrenia, 29 patients with bipolar disorder and 45 healthy volunteers. We then used statistical parametric mapping to estimate the main effects of diagnostic group, the main effect of genotype and their interaction. We tested the hypothesis that the high-risk variant of neuregulin1 would be associated with altered prefrontal function. In all three diagnostic groups, the high-risk variant of neuregulin1 was associated with greater deactivation in the left precuneus. In addition, there was an interaction between diagnosis and genotype in two regions of the prefrontal cortex. The right inferior frontal gyrus expressed increased activation in individuals with the high-risk variant, but only in patients with schizophrenia. Conversely, the right posterior orbital gyrus expressed increased activation in individuals with the high-risk variant, but only in patients with bipolar disorder. Our results suggest that genetic variation in neuregulin1 has a measurable impact on brain function and provide preliminary evidence for a disease-specific pattern of gene action in different regions of the prefrontal cortex. © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141845
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.463
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.464
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE)
Wellcome Trust Fellowship
Funding Information:

AM is funded by the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE). CF was funded by a Wellcome Trust Fellowship.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMechelli, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPrata, DPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFu, CHYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPicchioni, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorKane, Fen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKalidindi, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDemjaha, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKravariti, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorToulopoulou, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorCollier, DAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcGuire, PKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-27T03:03:10Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-27T03:03:10Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationNeuroimage, 2008, v. 42 n. 2, p. 817-826en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1053-8119en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141845-
dc.description.abstractRecent studies have identified neuregulin1 as a probable susceptibility gene for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. However, little is known about how this gene may affect brain function to increase vulnerability to these disorders. The present investigation examined the impact of neuregulin1 genotype on brain function in patients with schizophrenia, patients with bipolar I disorder and healthy volunteers. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure brain responses during a verbal fluency task in a total of 115 subjects comprising 41 patients with schizophrenia, 29 patients with bipolar disorder and 45 healthy volunteers. We then used statistical parametric mapping to estimate the main effects of diagnostic group, the main effect of genotype and their interaction. We tested the hypothesis that the high-risk variant of neuregulin1 would be associated with altered prefrontal function. In all three diagnostic groups, the high-risk variant of neuregulin1 was associated with greater deactivation in the left precuneus. In addition, there was an interaction between diagnosis and genotype in two regions of the prefrontal cortex. The right inferior frontal gyrus expressed increased activation in individuals with the high-risk variant, but only in patients with schizophrenia. Conversely, the right posterior orbital gyrus expressed increased activation in individuals with the high-risk variant, but only in patients with bipolar disorder. Our results suggest that genetic variation in neuregulin1 has a measurable impact on brain function and provide preliminary evidence for a disease-specific pattern of gene action in different regions of the prefrontal cortex. © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ynimgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofNeuroImageen_HK
dc.subjectBipolar disorderen_HK
dc.subjectFunctional magnetic resonance imagingen_HK
dc.subjectGeneticsen_HK
dc.subjectNeuregulin1en_HK
dc.subjectSchizophreniaen_HK
dc.subjectVerbal fluencyen_HK
dc.titleThe effects of neuregulin1 on brain function in controls and patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorderen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailToulopoulou, T:timothea@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityToulopoulou, T=rp01542en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.neuroimage.2008.05.025en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18585932-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-47949131223en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-47949131223&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume42en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage817en_HK
dc.identifier.epage826en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000258695200036-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMechelli, A=6603693131en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPrata, DP=14632352500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFu, CHY=8502155300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPicchioni, M=6507443795en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKane, F=24829114900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKalidindi, S=24366595400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcDonald, C=8749594800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDemjaha, A=23970361800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKravariti, E=8855469000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridToulopoulou, T=8855468700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMurray, R=35406239400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCollier, DA=26642980600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcGuire, PK=7101880438en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike3432720-

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