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Article: Neuropsychological correlates of eye movement abnormalities in schizophrenic patients and their unaffected relatives

TitleNeuropsychological correlates of eye movement abnormalities in schizophrenic patients and their unaffected relatives
Authors
KeywordsAntisaccade
Eye movement
Neuropsychology
Schizophrenia
Smooth pursuit
Issue Date2009
PublisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/psychres
Citation
Psychiatry Research, 2009, v. 168 n. 3, p. 193-197 How to Cite?
Abstract
Impairments on neuropsychological and eye movement tasks have been demonstrated in schizophrenic patients and also reported in their unaffected relatives. However, it is not clear to what extent these phenotypes overlap. This study examined the relationship between specific eye movement and neuropsychological measures. The relationship between performance on eye movement and neuropsychological tasks was measured in 79 schizophrenic patients (63% from multiply affected families), 129 of their healthy first-degree relatives, and 72 normal controls. Antisaccade scores were correlated with most measures of neurocognitive functioning, and this correlation was strongest in schizophrenic patients in all cases. In the schizophrenic patients, but not their relatives or controls, the antisaccade distractibility error (ADE) score correlated significantly with current intelligence, verbal memory (immediate and delayed recall), and associative learning. In the case of crystallised IQ and delayed verbal memory, smaller correlations were present in unaffected relatives, although neither survived Bonferroni correction. Smooth pursuit performance was unrelated to any neuropsychological measure. Our study suggests that antisaccade errors are likely to represent part of a generalized neuropsychological deficit in schizophrenia. © 2008 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141834
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 2.682
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.297
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Wellcome Trust
Stanley Medical Research Institute
Psychiatry Research Trust
Funding Information:

We would like to thank all the families who participated in the study and the Rethink, the National Schizophrenia Fellowship, for helping in the identification of families for the study. We would like to acknowledge the support of the Wellcome Trust, the Stanley Medical Research Institute and the Psychiatry Research Trust.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZanelli, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMacCabe, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorToulopoulou, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorWalshe, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Ren_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-27T03:02:52Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-27T03:02:52Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPsychiatry Research, 2009, v. 168 n. 3, p. 193-197en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0165-1781en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141834-
dc.description.abstractImpairments on neuropsychological and eye movement tasks have been demonstrated in schizophrenic patients and also reported in their unaffected relatives. However, it is not clear to what extent these phenotypes overlap. This study examined the relationship between specific eye movement and neuropsychological measures. The relationship between performance on eye movement and neuropsychological tasks was measured in 79 schizophrenic patients (63% from multiply affected families), 129 of their healthy first-degree relatives, and 72 normal controls. Antisaccade scores were correlated with most measures of neurocognitive functioning, and this correlation was strongest in schizophrenic patients in all cases. In the schizophrenic patients, but not their relatives or controls, the antisaccade distractibility error (ADE) score correlated significantly with current intelligence, verbal memory (immediate and delayed recall), and associative learning. In the case of crystallised IQ and delayed verbal memory, smaller correlations were present in unaffected relatives, although neither survived Bonferroni correction. Smooth pursuit performance was unrelated to any neuropsychological measure. Our study suggests that antisaccade errors are likely to represent part of a generalized neuropsychological deficit in schizophrenia. © 2008 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/psychresen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPsychiatry Researchen_HK
dc.subjectAntisaccadeen_HK
dc.subjectEye movementen_HK
dc.subjectNeuropsychologyen_HK
dc.subjectSchizophreniaen_HK
dc.subjectSmooth pursuiten_HK
dc.titleNeuropsychological correlates of eye movement abnormalities in schizophrenic patients and their unaffected relativesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailToulopoulou, T:timothea@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityToulopoulou, T=rp01542en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.psychres.2008.05.008en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19541370en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-67650578592en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-67650578592&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume168en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage193en_HK
dc.identifier.epage197en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000269118700004-
dc.publisher.placeIrelanden_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZanelli, J=9337612400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMacCabe, J=7003607616en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridToulopoulou, T=8855468700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWalshe, M=8855469300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcDonald, C=8749594800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMurray, R=35406239400en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike5466317-

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