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Article: Chinese-English biscriptal reading: Cognitive component skills across orthographies

TitleChinese-English biscriptal reading: Cognitive component skills across orthographies
Authors
KeywordsBi-scriptal reading
Hong Kong Chinese children
Morphological awareness
Phonological awareness
Visual-orthographic skills
Issue Date2010
PublisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0922-4777
Citation
Reading And Writing, 2010, v. 23 n. 3, p. 293-310 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study examined the associations of Chinese visual-orthographic skills, phonological awareness, and morphological awareness to Chinese and English word reading among 326 Hong Kong Chinese second- and fifth-graders learning English as a second language. Developmentally, tasks of visual-orthographic skill, phonological awareness, and morphological awareness improved with age. However, the extent to which each of the constructs explained variance in Chinese and English word reading was stable across age but differed by orthography. Across grades, visual-orthographic skills and morphological awareness, but not phonological awareness, were uniquely associated with Chinese character recognition with age and nonverbal IQ statistically controlled. In contrast, Chinese visual-orthographic skills and phonological awareness, but not morphological awareness, accounted for unique variance in English word reading even with the effects of Chinese character recognition and other reading-related cognitive tasks statistically controlled. Thus, only visual-orthographic skills appeared to be a consistent factor in explaining both Chinese and English word reading, perhaps in part because Hong Kong Chinese children are taught in school to read both Chinese and English using a "look and say" strategy that emphasizes visual analysis for word recognition. These findings extend previous research on Chinese visual-orthographic skills to English word reading and underscore commonality and uniqueness in bilingual reading acquisition. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141742
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.308
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.332
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTong, Xen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcBrideChang, Cen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-27T03:00:04Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-27T03:00:04Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationReading And Writing, 2010, v. 23 n. 3, p. 293-310en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0922-4777en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141742-
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the associations of Chinese visual-orthographic skills, phonological awareness, and morphological awareness to Chinese and English word reading among 326 Hong Kong Chinese second- and fifth-graders learning English as a second language. Developmentally, tasks of visual-orthographic skill, phonological awareness, and morphological awareness improved with age. However, the extent to which each of the constructs explained variance in Chinese and English word reading was stable across age but differed by orthography. Across grades, visual-orthographic skills and morphological awareness, but not phonological awareness, were uniquely associated with Chinese character recognition with age and nonverbal IQ statistically controlled. In contrast, Chinese visual-orthographic skills and phonological awareness, but not morphological awareness, accounted for unique variance in English word reading even with the effects of Chinese character recognition and other reading-related cognitive tasks statistically controlled. Thus, only visual-orthographic skills appeared to be a consistent factor in explaining both Chinese and English word reading, perhaps in part because Hong Kong Chinese children are taught in school to read both Chinese and English using a "look and say" strategy that emphasizes visual analysis for word recognition. These findings extend previous research on Chinese visual-orthographic skills to English word reading and underscore commonality and uniqueness in bilingual reading acquisition. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0922-4777en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofReading and Writingen_HK
dc.subjectBi-scriptal readingen_HK
dc.subjectHong Kong Chinese childrenen_HK
dc.subjectMorphological awarenessen_HK
dc.subjectPhonological awarenessen_HK
dc.subjectVisual-orthographic skillsen_HK
dc.titleChinese-English biscriptal reading: Cognitive component skills across orthographiesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailTong, X: xltong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTong, X=rp01546en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11145-009-9211-9en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77950459315en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77950459315&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume23en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage293en_HK
dc.identifier.epage310en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1573-0905-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000274438000003-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTong, X=24401758100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcBrideChang, C=7003801617en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike5916476-

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