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Article: Electrostatics of pharmaceutical inhalation aerosols

TitleElectrostatics of pharmaceutical inhalation aerosols
Authors
KeywordsDry powder inhaler
Electrostatic charge
Meter dose inhaler
Nebuliser
Pharmaceutical aerosol
Spacer
Issue Date2009
PublisherPharmaceutical Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pharmpress.com/jpp
Citation
Journal Of Pharmacy And Pharmacology, 2009, v. 61 n. 12, p. 1587-1599 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: This review focuses on the key findings and developments in the rapidly expanding research area of pharmaceutical aerosol electrostatics. Key findings: Data from limited in-vivo and computational studies suggest that charges may potentially affect particle deposition in the airways. Charging occurs naturally in the absence of electric fields through triboelectrification, that is contact or friction for solids and flowing or spraying for liquids. Thus, particles and droplets emitted from pulmonary drug delivery devices (dry powder inhalers, metered dose inhalers with or without spacers, and nebulisers) are inherently charged. Apparatus with various operation principles have been employed in the measurement of pharmaceutical charges. Aerosol charges are dependent on many physicochemical parameters, such as formulation composition, device construction, relative humidity and solid-state properties. In some devices, electrification has been purposefully applied to facilitate powder dispersion and liquid atomisation. Summary: Currently, there are no regulatory requirements on characterising electrostatic properties of inhalation aerosols. As research in this area progresses, the new knowledge gained may become valuable for the development and regulation of inhalation aerosol products. © 2009 The Authors.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141732
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.363
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.686
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKwok, PCLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, HKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-27T02:59:44Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-27T02:59:44Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Pharmacy And Pharmacology, 2009, v. 61 n. 12, p. 1587-1599en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-3573en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141732-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: This review focuses on the key findings and developments in the rapidly expanding research area of pharmaceutical aerosol electrostatics. Key findings: Data from limited in-vivo and computational studies suggest that charges may potentially affect particle deposition in the airways. Charging occurs naturally in the absence of electric fields through triboelectrification, that is contact or friction for solids and flowing or spraying for liquids. Thus, particles and droplets emitted from pulmonary drug delivery devices (dry powder inhalers, metered dose inhalers with or without spacers, and nebulisers) are inherently charged. Apparatus with various operation principles have been employed in the measurement of pharmaceutical charges. Aerosol charges are dependent on many physicochemical parameters, such as formulation composition, device construction, relative humidity and solid-state properties. In some devices, electrification has been purposefully applied to facilitate powder dispersion and liquid atomisation. Summary: Currently, there are no regulatory requirements on characterising electrostatic properties of inhalation aerosols. As research in this area progresses, the new knowledge gained may become valuable for the development and regulation of inhalation aerosol products. © 2009 The Authors.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPharmaceutical Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pharmpress.com/jppen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Pharmacy and Pharmacologyen_HK
dc.subjectDry powder inhaleren_HK
dc.subjectElectrostatic chargeen_HK
dc.subjectMeter dose inhaleren_HK
dc.subjectNebuliseren_HK
dc.subjectPharmaceutical aerosolen_HK
dc.subjectSpaceren_HK
dc.titleElectrostatics of pharmaceutical inhalation aerosolsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKwok, PCL: pclkwok@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKwok, PCL=rp01540en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1211/jpp/61.12.0002en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19958580-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-75749105483en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-75749105483&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume61en_HK
dc.identifier.issue12en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1587en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1599en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000281136700002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwok, PCL=12646007800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, HK=7403402677en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike6374629-

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