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Article: Electrostatic charge characteristics of jet nebulized aerosols

TitleElectrostatic charge characteristics of jet nebulized aerosols
Authors
KeywordsElectrical low pressure impactor (ELPI)
Electrostatic charge
Jet nebulizer
Liquid aerosol
Saline
Issue Date2010
Citation
Journal Of Aerosol Medicine And Pulmonary Drug Delivery, 2010, v. 23 n. 3, p. 149-159 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Liquid droplets can be spontaneously charged in the absence of applied electric fields by spraying. It has been shown by computational simulation that charges may influence particle deposition in the airways. The electrostatic properties of jet nebulized aerosols and their potential effects on lung deposition have hardly been studied. A modified electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI) was employed to characterize the aerosol charges generated from jet nebulized commercial products. Methods: The charge and size measurements were conducted at 50% RH and 22°C with a modified ELPI. Ventolin®, Bricanyl®, and Atrovent® were nebulized using PARI LC® Plus jet nebulizers coupled to a DeVilbiss Pulmo-Aide® compressor. The aerosols were sampled in 30-sec durations. The drug deposits on the impactor stages were assayed chemically using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The charges of nebulized deionized water, isotonic saline, and the three commercial products diluted with saline were also measured to analyze the contributions of the major nebule ingredients on charging. No mass assays were performed on these runs. Results: All three commercial nebules generated net negative charges. The magnitude of the charges reduced over the period of nebulization. Ventolin® and Bricanyl® yielded similar charge profiles. Highly variable charges were produced from deionized water. On the other hand, nebulized saline reproducibly generated net positive charges. Diluted commercial nebules showed charge polarity inversion. The charge profiles of diluted salbutamol and terbutaline solutions resembled those of saline, while the charges from diluted ipratropium solutions fluctuated near neutrality. Conclusions: The charge profiles were shown to be influenced by the concentration and physicochemical properties of the drugs, as well as the history of nebulization. The drugs may have unique isoelectric concentrations in saline at which the nebulized droplets would carry near-zero charges. According to results from computational simulation models in the literature, the numbers of elementary charges per droplet estimated from the data were not high enough to potentially affect lung deposition. © Copyright 2010, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141728
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.041
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.091
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Australian Research Council
The Netherlands Asthma Foundation
Funding Information:

Sebastiaan J. Trietsch was a recipient of The Netherlands Asthma Foundation Scholarship. Dr Tim Noakes (Ineos Fluor, UK) is thanked sincerely for his invaluable discussions on droplet charging. This work was financially supported by the Australian Research Council.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKwok, PCLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTrietsch, SJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKumon, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, HKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-27T02:59:41Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-27T02:59:41Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Aerosol Medicine And Pulmonary Drug Delivery, 2010, v. 23 n. 3, p. 149-159en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1941-2711en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141728-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Liquid droplets can be spontaneously charged in the absence of applied electric fields by spraying. It has been shown by computational simulation that charges may influence particle deposition in the airways. The electrostatic properties of jet nebulized aerosols and their potential effects on lung deposition have hardly been studied. A modified electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI) was employed to characterize the aerosol charges generated from jet nebulized commercial products. Methods: The charge and size measurements were conducted at 50% RH and 22°C with a modified ELPI. Ventolin®, Bricanyl®, and Atrovent® were nebulized using PARI LC® Plus jet nebulizers coupled to a DeVilbiss Pulmo-Aide® compressor. The aerosols were sampled in 30-sec durations. The drug deposits on the impactor stages were assayed chemically using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The charges of nebulized deionized water, isotonic saline, and the three commercial products diluted with saline were also measured to analyze the contributions of the major nebule ingredients on charging. No mass assays were performed on these runs. Results: All three commercial nebules generated net negative charges. The magnitude of the charges reduced over the period of nebulization. Ventolin® and Bricanyl® yielded similar charge profiles. Highly variable charges were produced from deionized water. On the other hand, nebulized saline reproducibly generated net positive charges. Diluted commercial nebules showed charge polarity inversion. The charge profiles of diluted salbutamol and terbutaline solutions resembled those of saline, while the charges from diluted ipratropium solutions fluctuated near neutrality. Conclusions: The charge profiles were shown to be influenced by the concentration and physicochemical properties of the drugs, as well as the history of nebulization. The drugs may have unique isoelectric concentrations in saline at which the nebulized droplets would carry near-zero charges. According to results from computational simulation models in the literature, the numbers of elementary charges per droplet estimated from the data were not high enough to potentially affect lung deposition. © Copyright 2010, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Aerosol Medicine and Pulmonary Drug Deliveryen_HK
dc.subjectElectrical low pressure impactor (ELPI)en_HK
dc.subjectElectrostatic chargeen_HK
dc.subjectJet nebulizeren_HK
dc.subjectLiquid aerosolen_HK
dc.subjectSalineen_HK
dc.titleElectrostatic charge characteristics of jet nebulized aerosolsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKwok, PCL: pclkwok@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKwok, PCL=rp01540en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/jamp.2009.0795en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20500092-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77953944347en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77953944347&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume23en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage149en_HK
dc.identifier.epage159en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1941-2703-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000278933100004-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwok, PCL=12646007800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTrietsch, SJ=55282943000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKumon, M=23567119400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, HK=7403402677en_HK

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