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Article: Urban infrastructure financing in reform-era china
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TitleUrban infrastructure financing in reform-era china
 
AuthorsWang, D3
Zhang, L4
Zhang, Z1
Zhao, SX2
 
KeywordsFiscal reform
Hierarchical system
Infrastructure
Urban economy
China
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherSage Publications Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://usj.sagepub.com/
 
CitationUrban Studies, 2011, v. 48 n. 14, p. 2975-2998 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0042098010392079
 
AbstractUrban infrastructure has been substantially upgraded in reform-era China. This paper explains, contextually and empirically, how Chinese cities finance their infrastructure. It demonstrates that China has succeeded in addressing urban infrastructure backlogs by opening up new venues for financing, but simultaneously, heavily relying on unconventional sources. The paper also argues that urban infrastructure financing has much to do with the country's transition to a market-oriented economy that fosters the pro-growth role of city governments as well as the redistribution of fiscal power between the levels of the urban hierarchy that produces significant variation of financial capacities among the different administrative ranks of cities. © 2011 Urban Studies Journal Limited.
 
ISSN0042-0980
2012 Impact Factor: 1.493
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0042098010392079
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000295119300003
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorWang, D
 
dc.contributor.authorZhang, L
 
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Z
 
dc.contributor.authorZhao, SX
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:45:47Z
 
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:45:47Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractUrban infrastructure has been substantially upgraded in reform-era China. This paper explains, contextually and empirically, how Chinese cities finance their infrastructure. It demonstrates that China has succeeded in addressing urban infrastructure backlogs by opening up new venues for financing, but simultaneously, heavily relying on unconventional sources. The paper also argues that urban infrastructure financing has much to do with the country's transition to a market-oriented economy that fosters the pro-growth role of city governments as well as the redistribution of fiscal power between the levels of the urban hierarchy that produces significant variation of financial capacities among the different administrative ranks of cities. © 2011 Urban Studies Journal Limited.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationUrban Studies, 2011, v. 48 n. 14, p. 2975-2998 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0042098010392079
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0042098010392079
 
dc.identifier.eissn1360-063X
 
dc.identifier.epage2998
 
dc.identifier.hkuros192895
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000295119300003
 
dc.identifier.issn0042-0980
2012 Impact Factor: 1.493
 
dc.identifier.issue14
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80053021811
 
dc.identifier.spage2975
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141615
 
dc.identifier.volume48
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://usj.sagepub.com/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofUrban Studies
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsUrban Studies. Copyright © Sage Publications Ltd..
 
dc.subjectFiscal reform
 
dc.subjectHierarchical system
 
dc.subjectInfrastructure
 
dc.subjectUrban economy
 
dc.subjectChina
 
dc.titleUrban infrastructure financing in reform-era china
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. Shanghai Tongji Urban Planning and Design Institute
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. Tongji University
  4. Fudan University