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Book Chapter: Executive and frontal lobe function

TitleExecutive and frontal lobe function
Authors
KeywordsSleep apnea syndromes -- Encyclopedias.
Issue Date2013
PublisherElsevier
Citation
Executive and frontal lobe function. In Kushida, CA (Ed.), Encyclopedia of sleep, p. 352-359. Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2013 How to Cite?
AbstractExecutive function impairment is frequently reported in studies of patients with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), although the findings are not always consistent. The most prominent deficits include working memory, phonological fluency, cognitive flexibility, and planning. Previous studies of executive deficits have been criticized for their lack of control over basic attentional processes in measuring executive function. It is proposed that such issues can be addressed statistically and by applying theory-driven approaches such as the working memory model. Detailed characterization of residual executive function deficits after treatment of OSA is critical for the evaluation of treatment outcome and the development of appropriate cognitive rehabilitation strategies.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141477
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLau, EYYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:38:22Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:38:22Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationExecutive and frontal lobe function. In Kushida, CA (Ed.), Encyclopedia of sleep, p. 352-359. Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2013en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9780123786104-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141477-
dc.description.abstractExecutive function impairment is frequently reported in studies of patients with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), although the findings are not always consistent. The most prominent deficits include working memory, phonological fluency, cognitive flexibility, and planning. Previous studies of executive deficits have been criticized for their lack of control over basic attentional processes in measuring executive function. It is proposed that such issues can be addressed statistically and by applying theory-driven approaches such as the working memory model. Detailed characterization of residual executive function deficits after treatment of OSA is critical for the evaluation of treatment outcome and the development of appropriate cognitive rehabilitation strategies.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier-
dc.relation.ispartofEncyclopedia of sleepen_US
dc.subjectSleep apnea syndromes -- Encyclopedias.-
dc.titleExecutive and frontal lobe functionen_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailLau, EYY: eyylau@HKUCC.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLau, EYY=rp00634en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/B978-0-12-378610-4.00334-X-
dc.identifier.hkuros193187en_US
dc.identifier.spage352-
dc.identifier.epage359-
dc.publisher.placeAmsterdam-
dc.customcontrol.immutableyiu 130528-

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