File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Book Chapter: Microfluidic fabrication of vesicles

TitleMicrofluidic fabrication of vesicles
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherSpringer
Citation
Microfluidic fabrication of vesicles. In Wang, L (Ed.), Advances in Transport Phenomena 2011, p. 1-28. Berlin: Springer, 2014 How to Cite?
AbstractVesicles are compartments enclosed by a thin membrane, which is made up of amphiphilic molecules arranged into ordered layers. Vesicle-like structures are Nature’s choice for encapsulating important biochemical species that enable living processes, and are increasingly important as artificial structures for the encapsulation and release of drugs, biomolecules and other active ingredients for biomedical, pharmaceutical, food and consumer industries. Advances in microfluidic technologies have provided a new set of tools for unraveling the science behind formation of vesicles and fabricating novel vesicles. While traditional approaches for fabricating vesicles rely on self-assembly of amphiphiles, the precise control of flow afforded in microfluidic devices enables directed assembly of the amphiphiles. Thus, techniques such as hydrodynamic flow focusing, controlled emulsion-templating and pulsatile jetting offer unprecedented degree of control over vesicle structures. This creates new opportunities to engineer the structures of vesicles and tailor them for specific applications. In this review, we introduce current understanding behind different kinds of vesicles, survey conventional and microfluidic techniques for their formation, discuss new approaches of encapsulation and release of active ingredients in microfluidic vesicles, and point to future research and development in the area.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141451
ISBN
Series/Report no.Advances in Transport Phenomena; vol. 3

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorShum, HCen_US
dc.contributor.authorThiele, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorKim, SHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:36:44Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:36:44Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationMicrofluidic fabrication of vesicles. In Wang, L (Ed.), Advances in Transport Phenomena 2011, p. 1-28. Berlin: Springer, 2014-
dc.identifier.isbn9783319017921-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141451-
dc.description.abstractVesicles are compartments enclosed by a thin membrane, which is made up of amphiphilic molecules arranged into ordered layers. Vesicle-like structures are Nature’s choice for encapsulating important biochemical species that enable living processes, and are increasingly important as artificial structures for the encapsulation and release of drugs, biomolecules and other active ingredients for biomedical, pharmaceutical, food and consumer industries. Advances in microfluidic technologies have provided a new set of tools for unraveling the science behind formation of vesicles and fabricating novel vesicles. While traditional approaches for fabricating vesicles rely on self-assembly of amphiphiles, the precise control of flow afforded in microfluidic devices enables directed assembly of the amphiphiles. Thus, techniques such as hydrodynamic flow focusing, controlled emulsion-templating and pulsatile jetting offer unprecedented degree of control over vesicle structures. This creates new opportunities to engineer the structures of vesicles and tailor them for specific applications. In this review, we introduce current understanding behind different kinds of vesicles, survey conventional and microfluidic techniques for their formation, discuss new approaches of encapsulation and release of active ingredients in microfluidic vesicles, and point to future research and development in the area.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer-
dc.relation.ispartofAdvances in Transport Phenomena 2011-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAdvances in Transport Phenomena; vol. 3-
dc.titleMicrofluidic fabrication of vesiclesen_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailShum, HC: ashum@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityShum, HC=rp01439en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-319-01793-8_1-
dc.identifier.hkuros193612en_US
dc.identifier.spage1-
dc.identifier.epage28-
dc.publisher.placeBerlin-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats