File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
  • Find via Find It@HKUL
Supplementary

Conference Paper: Tilting Saturn without tilting Jupiter or ejecting an ice giant: constraints on migration

TitleTilting Saturn without tilting Jupiter or ejecting an ice giant: constraints on migration
Authors
KeywordsAstronomy
Issue Date2010
PublisherAmerican Astronomical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.aas.org/publications/baas/baas.html
Citation
The 42nd Annual Meeting of the Division for Planetary Sciences of the American Astronomical Society, Pasadena, CA., 3-8 October 2010. In Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society, 2010, v. 42 n. 4, p. 948 How to Cite?
AbstractThe obliquities of the giant planets preserve information about their migration and encounter histories. Are the classic Nice models (Tsiganis et al. 2005) or the resonant Nice models (Morbidelli et al. 2007) compatible with Jupiter's 3 degree tilt and Saturn's 27? Here we consider the obliquity evolution of the giants during the planetesimal-driven migration phase using two methods: (1) a purely secular integration of the Laplace-Lagrange equations with spin, and (2) a hybrid N-body scheme with full interactions between the Sun and the giants but imposed prescriptions for migration and eccentricity and inclination damping. We find that it is difficult to reproduce today's obliquity values as migration timescales sufficient to tilt Saturn via the Hamilton & Ward (2004) secular spin-orbit resonance mechanism generally suffice to tilt Jupiter more than is observed. Moreover, long migration timescales which make tilting Saturn easier simultaneously reduce the survival fraction (to below 20% for timescales longer than 20 Myr.) We discuss the constraints these observations provide on the dynamical history of the giant planets, and the remaining possibility of tilting Saturn during a late very slow migration of Neptune to its present location after the main phase of migration is complete. [This work was supported by Hong Kong RGC grant HKU 7024/08P.]
DescriptionOral - Session 04. Solar System Origin, Planet and Satellite Formation: 04.04
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141322
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMcNeil, DSen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, MHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:30:38Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:30:38Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 42nd Annual Meeting of the Division for Planetary Sciences of the American Astronomical Society, Pasadena, CA., 3-8 October 2010. In Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society, 2010, v. 42 n. 4, p. 948en_US
dc.identifier.issn0002-7537-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141322-
dc.descriptionOral - Session 04. Solar System Origin, Planet and Satellite Formation: 04.04-
dc.description.abstractThe obliquities of the giant planets preserve information about their migration and encounter histories. Are the classic Nice models (Tsiganis et al. 2005) or the resonant Nice models (Morbidelli et al. 2007) compatible with Jupiter's 3 degree tilt and Saturn's 27? Here we consider the obliquity evolution of the giants during the planetesimal-driven migration phase using two methods: (1) a purely secular integration of the Laplace-Lagrange equations with spin, and (2) a hybrid N-body scheme with full interactions between the Sun and the giants but imposed prescriptions for migration and eccentricity and inclination damping. We find that it is difficult to reproduce today's obliquity values as migration timescales sufficient to tilt Saturn via the Hamilton & Ward (2004) secular spin-orbit resonance mechanism generally suffice to tilt Jupiter more than is observed. Moreover, long migration timescales which make tilting Saturn easier simultaneously reduce the survival fraction (to below 20% for timescales longer than 20 Myr.) We discuss the constraints these observations provide on the dynamical history of the giant planets, and the remaining possibility of tilting Saturn during a late very slow migration of Neptune to its present location after the main phase of migration is complete. [This work was supported by Hong Kong RGC grant HKU 7024/08P.]-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Astronomical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.aas.org/publications/baas/baas.html-
dc.relation.ispartofBulletin of the American Astronomical Societyen_US
dc.rightsBulletin of the American Astronomical Society. Copyright © American Astronomical Society.-
dc.subjectAstronomy-
dc.titleTilting Saturn without tilting Jupiter or ejecting an ice giant: constraints on migrationen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailMcNeil, DS: mcneil@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, MH: mhlee@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, MH=rp00724en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros194800en_US
dc.identifier.volume42-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage948-
dc.identifier.epage948-
dc.description.otherThe 42nd Annual Meeting of the Division for Planetary Sciences of the American Astronomical Society, Pasadena, CA., 3-8 October 2010. In Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society, 2010, v. 42 n. 4, p. 948-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats