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Article: How is health a security issue? Politics, responses and issues

TitleHow is health a security issue? Politics, responses and issues
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://heapol.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Health Policy and Planning, 2010, v. 25 n. 6, p. 447-453 How to Cite?
AbstractIn the closing decade of the 20th century the myriad challenges posed by infectious disease in a globalized environment began to be re-conceptualized as threats to national and human security. The most widely applied model for identifying and responding to such threats is securitization theory, as proposed by the Copenhagen School. Although its analytical framework is generally accepted, its utility remains contested; especially in non-European and non-state settings. The papers in this special edition have several aims: (1) to analyse ways by which Asian states and international organizations have identified health challenges as security threats, (2) to draw upon the securitization model as a way of understanding the full extent to which these states and international organizations have responded to the health threat, and (3) to identify areas where the theory might be strengthened so as to provide greater analytical clarity in areas of health security. This paper acts as a broad introduction to a set of papers on 'Unhealthy governance' and explores some of the key findings from the subsequent papers. © The Author 2010; all rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141089
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.513
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.628
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Ford Foundation
Funding Information:

The research for this article was supported by a grant from the Ford Foundation's Non-Traditional Security in Asia project for the workshop titled: Unhealthy Governance: Securitising Infectious Diseases in Asia. The authors would like to express their sincere thanks to the two sets of referees who provided critical feedback on this paper as well as the comments from the other workshop participants.

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLo, CYPen_US
dc.contributor.authorThomas, N-
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:25:24Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:25:24Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationHealth Policy and Planning, 2010, v. 25 n. 6, p. 447-453en_US
dc.identifier.issn0268-1080-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141089-
dc.description.abstractIn the closing decade of the 20th century the myriad challenges posed by infectious disease in a globalized environment began to be re-conceptualized as threats to national and human security. The most widely applied model for identifying and responding to such threats is securitization theory, as proposed by the Copenhagen School. Although its analytical framework is generally accepted, its utility remains contested; especially in non-European and non-state settings. The papers in this special edition have several aims: (1) to analyse ways by which Asian states and international organizations have identified health challenges as security threats, (2) to draw upon the securitization model as a way of understanding the full extent to which these states and international organizations have responded to the health threat, and (3) to identify areas where the theory might be strengthened so as to provide greater analytical clarity in areas of health security. This paper acts as a broad introduction to a set of papers on 'Unhealthy governance' and explores some of the key findings from the subsequent papers. © The Author 2010; all rights reserved.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://heapol.oxfordjournals.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofHealth Policy and Planningen_US
dc.subject.meshHazardous Substances-
dc.subject.meshHealth Status-
dc.subject.meshPandemics-
dc.subject.meshPolitics-
dc.subject.meshSecurity Measures-
dc.titleHow is health a security issue? Politics, responses and issuesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/heapol/czq063-
dc.identifier.pmid20961945-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77958611134-
dc.identifier.hkuros194528en_US
dc.identifier.volume25en_US
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage447en_US
dc.identifier.epage453en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000283676700001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.citeulike8167134-

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