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Article: Forging national unity: Ideas of race in China

TitleForging national unity: Ideas of race in China
Authors
KeywordsRace relations
Minority & ethnic groups
Nationalism
Issue Date2010
PublisherCentre for World Dialogue. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.worlddialogue.org/gd.php
Citation
Global Dialogue (online), 2010, v. 12 n. 2, p. 23-35 How to Cite?
AbstractWhile over fifty different 'minority nationalities' (shaoshu minzu) are officially recognized to exist in the People's Republic of China, well over 90% of the population are classified as 'Han', a term translated in English as 'ethnic Chinese' or 'Chinese of native stock'. Despite the existence in China of cultural, linguistic and regional differences which are as great as those to be found in Europe, the Han are claimed by mainland officials to be a homogeneous ethnic group (minzu) with common origins, a shared history and an ancestral territory. Racial theories have underpinned nationalism in China since 1895. Precisely because of the extreme diversity of religious practices, family structures, spoken languages and regional cultures of population groups that have been defined as 'Chinese', the notion of race has emerged as very powerful and cohesive form of identity. Racial theories have been used by the late Qing reformers, the anti-Manchu revolutionaries, the Kuomintang nationalists, and, more recently, by a number of educated circles in the People's Republic.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141068
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDikotter, Fen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:24:56Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:24:56Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationGlobal Dialogue (online), 2010, v. 12 n. 2, p. 23-35en_US
dc.identifier.issn1986-2601-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141068-
dc.description.abstractWhile over fifty different 'minority nationalities' (shaoshu minzu) are officially recognized to exist in the People's Republic of China, well over 90% of the population are classified as 'Han', a term translated in English as 'ethnic Chinese' or 'Chinese of native stock'. Despite the existence in China of cultural, linguistic and regional differences which are as great as those to be found in Europe, the Han are claimed by mainland officials to be a homogeneous ethnic group (minzu) with common origins, a shared history and an ancestral territory. Racial theories have underpinned nationalism in China since 1895. Precisely because of the extreme diversity of religious practices, family structures, spoken languages and regional cultures of population groups that have been defined as 'Chinese', the notion of race has emerged as very powerful and cohesive form of identity. Racial theories have been used by the late Qing reformers, the anti-Manchu revolutionaries, the Kuomintang nationalists, and, more recently, by a number of educated circles in the People's Republic.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCentre for World Dialogue. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.worlddialogue.org/gd.php-
dc.relation.ispartofGlobal Dialogue (online)en_US
dc.subjectRace relations-
dc.subjectMinority & ethnic groups-
dc.subjectNationalism-
dc.titleForging national unity: Ideas of race in Chinaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailDikotter, F: dikotter@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityDikotter, F=rp01187en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros194825en_US
dc.identifier.volume12en_US
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage23en_US
dc.identifier.epage35en_US
dc.publisher.placeCyprus-

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