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Article: Towards a thick description of Maoist discourse: with help from Zhao Shuli

TitleTowards a thick description of Maoist discourse: with help from Zhao Shuli
對毛澤東時代話語的一種厚重描述:以趙樹理為例
Authors
KeywordsZhao Shuli
Orientalism
Left-wing literature
Rural labor
Marxism
Issue Date2012
PublisherZhongguo Wenyi Lilun Xuehui. The Journal's web site is located at http://202.120.85.33/Jweb_wyllyj/EN/column/column105.shtml
Citation
文藝理論硏究, 2012, v. 32 n. 6, p. 108-114 How to Cite?
Theoretical Studies in Literature and Art, 2012, v. 32 n. 6, p. 108-114 How to Cite?
AbstractWith a few exceptions much of the knowledge of modern China produced in the world either ignores or demonizes the Mao era. On the cultural front things are not much better, whether we are speaking of the 'Seventeen-year’s Literature' or the culture of the 1960s and 1970s. The negation of the Mao or radical era is, in short, a crucial part of contemporary Sinological-orientalism. There is however a recovery and reorientation project underway that seeks to restore the complexity of the Mao decades and its pursuit of an alternative, agrarian, and socialist modernity. As part of this project I offer an appropriately Foucaultian and Marxist notion of Maoist discourse. By framing that era in terms of its past Maoist discourse we can at least begin to take the revolution and its culture more seriously in its own terms and self-understanding. This has the added advantage of explaining the productive power and subjectivity of Chinese Maoism and its culture without recourse to the Cold War/colonial notion of 'totalitarianism.' Yet Maoist discourse, like China’s 'alternative modernity,' remain concepts more often announced than substantiated. The rich, challenging work of the rural writer Zhao Shuli offers us an ideal case study of what Maoist discourse was in cultural-philosophical terms. The second part of this essay offers a reading of selected short fiction from Zhao in terms of how it draws on and illuminates Maoist discourse, resulting in a literary art of remarkable political complexity and contextual detail. With Zhao it is 'politics in command' in a genuine sense; this is not a flaw but its entire point.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141062
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorVukovich, DFen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:24:54Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:24:54Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citation文藝理論硏究, 2012, v. 32 n. 6, p. 108-114en_US
dc.identifier.citationTheoretical Studies in Literature and Art, 2012, v. 32 n. 6, p. 108-114-
dc.identifier.issn0257-0254en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141062-
dc.description.abstractWith a few exceptions much of the knowledge of modern China produced in the world either ignores or demonizes the Mao era. On the cultural front things are not much better, whether we are speaking of the 'Seventeen-year’s Literature' or the culture of the 1960s and 1970s. The negation of the Mao or radical era is, in short, a crucial part of contemporary Sinological-orientalism. There is however a recovery and reorientation project underway that seeks to restore the complexity of the Mao decades and its pursuit of an alternative, agrarian, and socialist modernity. As part of this project I offer an appropriately Foucaultian and Marxist notion of Maoist discourse. By framing that era in terms of its past Maoist discourse we can at least begin to take the revolution and its culture more seriously in its own terms and self-understanding. This has the added advantage of explaining the productive power and subjectivity of Chinese Maoism and its culture without recourse to the Cold War/colonial notion of 'totalitarianism.' Yet Maoist discourse, like China’s 'alternative modernity,' remain concepts more often announced than substantiated. The rich, challenging work of the rural writer Zhao Shuli offers us an ideal case study of what Maoist discourse was in cultural-philosophical terms. The second part of this essay offers a reading of selected short fiction from Zhao in terms of how it draws on and illuminates Maoist discourse, resulting in a literary art of remarkable political complexity and contextual detail. With Zhao it is 'politics in command' in a genuine sense; this is not a flaw but its entire point.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherZhongguo Wenyi Lilun Xuehui. The Journal's web site is located at http://202.120.85.33/Jweb_wyllyj/EN/column/column105.shtmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartof文藝理論硏究en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTheoretical Studies in Literature and Art-
dc.subjectZhao Shuli-
dc.subjectOrientalism-
dc.subjectLeft-wing literature-
dc.subjectRural labor-
dc.subjectMarxism-
dc.titleTowards a thick description of Maoist discourse: with help from Zhao Shulien_US
dc.title對毛澤東時代話語的一種厚重描述:以趙樹理為例-
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1673-7318&volume=&spage=&epage=&date=2012&atitle=Towards+a+Thick+Description+of+Maoist+Discourse:+With+Help+from+Zhao+Shulien_US
dc.identifier.emailVukovich, DF: vukovich@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityVukovich, DF=rp01178en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros193101en_US
dc.identifier.volume32-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage108-
dc.identifier.epage114-
dc.publisher.placeChina-

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