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Article: The end of "re-colonization": On Hong Kong, knowledge, and G.O.D

TitleThe end of "re-colonization": On Hong Kong, knowledge, and G.O.D
Authors
Keywords1997 handover
China
Colonization
Globalization
Hong Kong
Orientalism
Politics of knowledge
Rey Chow
Issue Date2012
PublisherAkademiai Kiado Rt.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.akademiai.com/content/105736
Citation
Neohelicon, 2012, v. 39 n. 1, p. 167-182 How to Cite?
AbstractHong Kong studies often argue that 1997-a key moment of globalization-marked not re-unification and an end of colonialism but a "re-colonization" at the hands of Beijing. This essay refutes this claim on several grounds and situates it in the context of global knowledge production about China. When we interrogate the historiographic and cultural studies claims for a re-colonization we see that this is more often announced than substantiated. The claim is intellectually problematic on legal, historical and popular opinion grounds. It moreover indicates a continuing contradiction dating from the colonial/Cold War era in how knowledge about China, and China-Hong Kong is produced. Such work does not engage mainland perspectives but rather tends to "other" or orientalize the P. R. C. Globalization has not altered this academic/knowledge imbalance. But this may be changing in the commercial and popular realms. This essay's final section analyzes the emergence of a Hong Kong-P. R. C. hybrid identity as seen in the design work of G. O. D, a local chain that sells home-goods, clothes, and the like with an avowed emphasis on both local and P. R. C. culture (e. g. Mao era things). All of this taken together suggests an end to the claim of re-colonization. Hong Kong has moved on and is now part of China's globalization; the realm of knowledge production will, one should think, eventually catch up. © 2012 Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141060
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.128
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorVukovich, Den_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:24:53Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:24:53Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationNeohelicon, 2012, v. 39 n. 1, p. 167-182en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0324-4652en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141060-
dc.description.abstractHong Kong studies often argue that 1997-a key moment of globalization-marked not re-unification and an end of colonialism but a "re-colonization" at the hands of Beijing. This essay refutes this claim on several grounds and situates it in the context of global knowledge production about China. When we interrogate the historiographic and cultural studies claims for a re-colonization we see that this is more often announced than substantiated. The claim is intellectually problematic on legal, historical and popular opinion grounds. It moreover indicates a continuing contradiction dating from the colonial/Cold War era in how knowledge about China, and China-Hong Kong is produced. Such work does not engage mainland perspectives but rather tends to "other" or orientalize the P. R. C. Globalization has not altered this academic/knowledge imbalance. But this may be changing in the commercial and popular realms. This essay's final section analyzes the emergence of a Hong Kong-P. R. C. hybrid identity as seen in the design work of G. O. D, a local chain that sells home-goods, clothes, and the like with an avowed emphasis on both local and P. R. C. culture (e. g. Mao era things). All of this taken together suggests an end to the claim of re-colonization. Hong Kong has moved on and is now part of China's globalization; the realm of knowledge production will, one should think, eventually catch up. © 2012 Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAkademiai Kiado Rt.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.akademiai.com/content/105736en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofNeoheliconen_HK
dc.rightsThe file is not the final published version of the paper. The article is published in Neohelicon, 2012, v. 39 n. 1, p. 167-182. DOI of the published paper: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11059-012-0136-y-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject1997 handoveren_HK
dc.subjectChinaen_HK
dc.subjectColonizationen_HK
dc.subjectGlobalizationen_HK
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subjectOrientalismen_HK
dc.subjectPolitics of knowledgeen_HK
dc.subjectRey Chowen_HK
dc.titleThe end of "re-colonization": On Hong Kong, knowledge, and G.O.Den_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailVukovich, D: vukovich@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityVukovich, D=rp01178en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11059-012-0136-yen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84862506684en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros193067en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros207418-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84862506684&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume39en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage167en_HK
dc.identifier.epage182en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000305230300012-
dc.publisher.placeHungaryen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVukovich, D=36703703400en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike10524829-

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