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Article: Neural coding of movement direction in the healthy human brain

TitleNeural coding of movement direction in the healthy human brain
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
Citation
Plos One, 2010, v. 5 n. 10 How to Cite?
AbstractNeurophysiological studies in monkeys show that activity of neurons in primary cortex (M1), pre-motor cortex (PMC), and cerebellum varies systematically with the direction of reaching movements. These neurons exhibit preferred direction tuning, where the level of neural activity is highest when movements are made in the preferred direction (PD), and gets progressively lower as movements are made at increasing degrees of offset from the PD. Using a functional magnetic resonance imaging adaptation (fMRI-A) paradigm, we show that PD coding does exist in regions of the human motor system that are homologous to those observed in non-human primates. Consistent with predictions of the PD model, we show adaptation (i.e., a lower level) of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) time-course signal in M1, PMC, SMA, and cerebellum when consecutive wrist movements were made in the same direction (0° offset) relative to movements offset by 90° or 180°. The BOLD signal in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex adapted equally in all movement offset conditions, mitigating against the possibility that the present results are the consequence of differential task complexity or attention to action in each movement offset condition. Copyright: © 2010 Cowper-Smith et al.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141022
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.057
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.395
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation
Dalhousie Medical Research Foundation
Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Institutes de recherche en sante du Canada (CIHR/IRCS)
Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation (NSHRF)
Sir Edward Youde Memorial Overseas Fellowship
Dalhousie Faculty of Medicine Clinical Research
CIHR
Funding Information:

This research was funded by the Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation and the Dalhousie Medical Research Foundation. CCS was supported by studentships from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Institutes de recherche en sante du Canada (CIHR/IRCS) and the Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation (NSHRF). This research was previously published as part of CCS' MSc thesis. EL was supported by the Sir Edward Youde Memorial Overseas Fellowship, and GE was supported by a Dalhousie Faculty of Medicine Clinical Research Scholar Award. DW was supported by a CIHR New Investigator Award. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCowperSmith, CDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, EYYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHelmick, CAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorEskes, GAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWestwood, DAen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:23:34Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:23:34Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPlos One, 2010, v. 5 n. 10en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141022-
dc.description.abstractNeurophysiological studies in monkeys show that activity of neurons in primary cortex (M1), pre-motor cortex (PMC), and cerebellum varies systematically with the direction of reaching movements. These neurons exhibit preferred direction tuning, where the level of neural activity is highest when movements are made in the preferred direction (PD), and gets progressively lower as movements are made at increasing degrees of offset from the PD. Using a functional magnetic resonance imaging adaptation (fMRI-A) paradigm, we show that PD coding does exist in regions of the human motor system that are homologous to those observed in non-human primates. Consistent with predictions of the PD model, we show adaptation (i.e., a lower level) of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) time-course signal in M1, PMC, SMA, and cerebellum when consecutive wrist movements were made in the same direction (0° offset) relative to movements offset by 90° or 180°. The BOLD signal in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex adapted equally in all movement offset conditions, mitigating against the possibility that the present results are the consequence of differential task complexity or attention to action in each movement offset condition. Copyright: © 2010 Cowper-Smith et al.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.actionen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONEen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshBrain - physiology-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.titleNeural coding of movement direction in the healthy human brainen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, EYY:eyylau@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, EYY=rp00634en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0013330en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20967197-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2954155-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78149440479en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros193169en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78149440479&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume5en_HK
dc.identifier.issue10en_HK
dc.identifier.spagee13330en_US
dc.identifier.epagee13330en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000282869800028-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCowperSmith, CD=24479665700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, EYY=36448882600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHelmick, CA=36876255400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEskes, GA=6701737958en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWestwood, DA=7004675361en_HK

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