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Article: Lying about the valence of affective pictures: An fMRI study

TitleLying about the valence of affective pictures: An fMRI study
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
Citation
Plos One, 2010, v. 5 n. 8 How to Cite?
AbstractThe neural correlates of lying about affective information were studied using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) methodology. Specifically, 13 healthy right-handed Chinese men were instructed to lie about the valence, positive or negative, of pictures selected from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) while their brain activity was scanned by a 3T Philip Achieva scanner. The key finding is that the neural activity associated with deception is valence-related. Comparing to telling the truth, deception about the valence of the affectively positive pictures was associated with activity in the inferior frontal, cingulate, inferior parietal, precuneus, and middle temporal regions. Lying about the valence of the affectively negative pictures, on the other hand, was associated with activity in the orbital and medial frontal regions. While a clear valence-related effect on deception was observed, common neural regions were also recruited for the process of deception about the valence of the affective pictures. These regions included the lateral prefrontal and inferior parietal regions. Activity in these regions has been widely reported in fMRI studies on deception using affectively-neutral stimuli. The findings of this study reveal the effect of valence on the neural activity associated with deception. Furthermore, the data also help to illustrate the complexity of the neural mechanisms underlying deception. © 2010 Lee et al.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141018
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.057
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.395
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong
National Natural Science Foundation of China30828012
Funding Information:

This project was supported by the May Endowed Professorship of The University of Hong Kong and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (#30828012). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, TMCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, TMYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRaine, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, CCHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:23:32Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:23:32Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPlos One, 2010, v. 5 n. 8en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141018-
dc.description.abstractThe neural correlates of lying about affective information were studied using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) methodology. Specifically, 13 healthy right-handed Chinese men were instructed to lie about the valence, positive or negative, of pictures selected from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) while their brain activity was scanned by a 3T Philip Achieva scanner. The key finding is that the neural activity associated with deception is valence-related. Comparing to telling the truth, deception about the valence of the affectively positive pictures was associated with activity in the inferior frontal, cingulate, inferior parietal, precuneus, and middle temporal regions. Lying about the valence of the affectively negative pictures, on the other hand, was associated with activity in the orbital and medial frontal regions. While a clear valence-related effect on deception was observed, common neural regions were also recruited for the process of deception about the valence of the affective pictures. These regions included the lateral prefrontal and inferior parietal regions. Activity in these regions has been widely reported in fMRI studies on deception using affectively-neutral stimuli. The findings of this study reveal the effect of valence on the neural activity associated with deception. Furthermore, the data also help to illustrate the complexity of the neural mechanisms underlying deception. © 2010 Lee et al.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.actionen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONEen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshAffect - physiology-
dc.subject.meshBrain - physiology-
dc.subject.meshDeception-
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging-
dc.subject.meshPhotography-
dc.titleLying about the valence of affective pictures: An fMRI studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, TMC:tmclee@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, TMC=rp00564en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0012291en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20811624-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2928271-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77957860637en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros193127en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77957860637&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume5en_HK
dc.identifier.issue8en_HK
dc.identifier.spagee12291en_US
dc.identifier.epagee12291en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000281234700004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, TMC=7501437381en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, TMY=36637725800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRaine, A=7102893592en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, CCH=16244174500en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7866177-

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