File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Personality traits and social behaviors predict the psychological adjustment of Chinese people with epilepsy

TitlePersonality traits and social behaviors predict the psychological adjustment of Chinese people with epilepsy
Authors
KeywordsAnxiety
Chinese
Depression
Epilepsy
Personality
Social skills
Issue Date2010
PublisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/seizure
Citation
Seizure, 2010, v. 19 n. 8, p. 493-500 How to Cite?
AbstractVery little is known about the psychosocial correlates of psychological morbidity among Chinese people with epilepsy (PWE). No studies have investigated the association between social relationships and psychological morbidity, while most studies examined only the negative impact of maladaptive personalities on psychological adjustment in PWE. This study examined the association of psychological morbidity with a broad array of personality traits and social skills in a sample of 54 Chinese PWE. Respondents completed the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), the Social Performance Survey Schedule (SPSS), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) via semi-structured interview. Regression analyses revealed that, independent of demographic and medical variables and perceived impact, Harm Avoidance was positively associated with anxiety and depression whereas Self-Directedness was negatively associated with anxiety and depression; that Cooperativeness was inversely associated with anxiety. Social skills were inversely associated with depression whereas negative social skills were inversely associated with anxiety. Clinical implications of adaptive personality traits and social skills functioning are discussed. © 2010 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141017
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.109
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.792
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
S.K. Yee Medical Foundation
NSFC
Funding Information:

This project was supported by the S.K. Yee Medical Foundation and the matching fund for NSFC Academic Collaboration Award. We would like to thank all the participants for their time and participation. We would also like to thank Mr. Vincent Hu of The Community Rehabilitation Network, The Hong Kong Society for Rehabilitation, for his assistance with participant recruitment.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMa, TMKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHou, WKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHung, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, TMCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:23:32Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:23:32Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSeizure, 2010, v. 19 n. 8, p. 493-500en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1059-1311en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141017-
dc.description.abstractVery little is known about the psychosocial correlates of psychological morbidity among Chinese people with epilepsy (PWE). No studies have investigated the association between social relationships and psychological morbidity, while most studies examined only the negative impact of maladaptive personalities on psychological adjustment in PWE. This study examined the association of psychological morbidity with a broad array of personality traits and social skills in a sample of 54 Chinese PWE. Respondents completed the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), the Social Performance Survey Schedule (SPSS), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) via semi-structured interview. Regression analyses revealed that, independent of demographic and medical variables and perceived impact, Harm Avoidance was positively associated with anxiety and depression whereas Self-Directedness was negatively associated with anxiety and depression; that Cooperativeness was inversely associated with anxiety. Social skills were inversely associated with depression whereas negative social skills were inversely associated with anxiety. Clinical implications of adaptive personality traits and social skills functioning are discussed. © 2010 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/seizureen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSeizureen_HK
dc.subjectAnxietyen_HK
dc.subjectChineseen_HK
dc.subjectDepressionen_HK
dc.subjectEpilepsyen_HK
dc.subjectPersonalityen_HK
dc.subjectSocial skillsen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Psychological-
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics and numerical data-
dc.subject.meshEpilepsy - ethnology - psychology-
dc.subject.meshPersonality-
dc.subject.meshSocial Behavior-
dc.titlePersonality traits and social behaviors predict the psychological adjustment of Chinese people with epilepsyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHou, WK:en_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, TMC: tmclee@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHou, WK=rp01481en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, TMC=rp00564en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.seizure.2010.07.006en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20702122-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77957283604en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros193126en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77957283604&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume19en_HK
dc.identifier.issue8en_HK
dc.identifier.spage493en_HK
dc.identifier.epage500en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000283401400008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMa, TMK=8646823600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHou, WK=35147323500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHung, A=18039958100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, TMC=7501437381en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats