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Article: Genetic and environmental influences on Chinese language and reading abilities

TitleGenetic and environmental influences on Chinese language and reading abilities
Authors
KeywordsLanguage ability
Human genetics
Environmental factor
School child
Phonetics
Issue Date2011
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
Citation
Plos One, 2011, v. 6 n. 2 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study investigated the etiology of individual differences in Chinese language and reading skills in 312 typically developing Chinese twin pairs aged from 3 to 11 years (228 pairs of monozygotic twins and 84 pairs of dizygotic twins; 166 male pairs and 146 female pairs). Children were individually given tasks of Chinese word reading, receptive vocabulary, phonological memory, tone awareness, syllable and rhyme awareness, rapid automatized naming, morphological awareness and orthographic skills, and Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices. All analyses controlled for the effects of age. There were moderate to substantial genetic influences on word reading, tone awareness, phonological memory, morphological awareness and rapid automatized naming (estimates ranged from .42 to .73), while shared environment exerted moderate to strong effects on receptive vocabulary, syllable and rhyme awareness and orthographic skills (estimates ranged from .35 to .63). Results were largely unchanged when scores were adjusted for nonverbal reasoning as well as age. Findings of this study are mostly similar to those found for English, a language with very different characteristics, and suggest the universality of genetic and environmental influences across languages. © 2011 Chow et al.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141015
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.057
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.395
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative RegionHKU743907H
Wellcome Trust of the United Kingdom082498/z/07
Funding Information:

This research was supported by grants from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKU743907H) and the Wellcome Trust of the United Kingdom (082498/z/07). Funders' website: http://www.ugc.edu.hk/eng/rgc/index.htm,http://www/wellcome.ac.uk/. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChow, BWYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, CSHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, SWLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWaye, MMYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBishop, DVMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:23:31Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:23:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPlos One, 2011, v. 6 n. 2en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/141015-
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the etiology of individual differences in Chinese language and reading skills in 312 typically developing Chinese twin pairs aged from 3 to 11 years (228 pairs of monozygotic twins and 84 pairs of dizygotic twins; 166 male pairs and 146 female pairs). Children were individually given tasks of Chinese word reading, receptive vocabulary, phonological memory, tone awareness, syllable and rhyme awareness, rapid automatized naming, morphological awareness and orthographic skills, and Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices. All analyses controlled for the effects of age. There were moderate to substantial genetic influences on word reading, tone awareness, phonological memory, morphological awareness and rapid automatized naming (estimates ranged from .42 to .73), while shared environment exerted moderate to strong effects on receptive vocabulary, syllable and rhyme awareness and orthographic skills (estimates ranged from .35 to .63). Results were largely unchanged when scores were adjusted for nonverbal reasoning as well as age. Findings of this study are mostly similar to those found for English, a language with very different characteristics, and suggest the universality of genetic and environmental influences across languages. © 2011 Chow et al.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.actionen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONEen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectLanguage ability-
dc.subjectHuman genetics-
dc.subjectEnvironmental factor-
dc.subjectSchool child-
dc.subjectPhonetics-
dc.titleGenetic and environmental influences on Chinese language and reading abilitiesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, CSH:shhoc@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, CSH=rp00631en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0016640en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21347359-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3037369-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79951846698en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros193022en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79951846698&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume6en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spagee16640-
dc.identifier.epagee16640-
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000287363000012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChow, BWY=8336425800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, CSH=35095289900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, SWL=35095800900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWaye, MMY=7006687733en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBishop, DVM=7401913614en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9090585-

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