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Article: Anthropogenic structures as a spatial refuge from predation for the invasive bryozoan bugula neritina

TitleAnthropogenic structures as a spatial refuge from predation for the invasive bryozoan bugula neritina
Authors
KeywordsArtificial habitat
Fouling
Invasive species
Predation
Rock shrimp
Sea urchin
Issue Date2011
PublisherInter-Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.int-res.com/journals/meps/index.html
Citation
Marine Ecology Progress Series, 2011, v. 427, p. 95-103 How to Cite?
AbstractAnthropogenic structures may play an important role in the marine invasion process by providing novel artificial habitats, often out of the reach of common benthic predators. A survey of piers in northern-central Chile revealed a change in the epibenthic assemblage on pilings at different distances from a rocky shore with abundant grazers and predators. Pilings on soft sediment, away from the rocky shore, were heavily colonized by the invasive bryozoan Bugula neritina. We therefore hypothesized that benthic predators may forage on pilings located on rocky bottom whereas pilings on soft sediment benefit from the absence of generalist benthic predators which do not occur on soft sediment. We examined piling communities using cages directly attached to pilings, where we included or excluded the sea urchin Tetrapygus niger and the rock shrimp Rhyncocinetes typus. Resultant communities differed substantially; a high percentage of bare space occurred in the presence of sea urchins, while turf algae dominated in the presence of shrimp. Both sea urchins and shrimp suppressed the colonization of the invasive B. neritina and, when acting together, totally prevented its recruitment. In contrast, invasive bryozoans colonized 95% of the available substratum in cages where predators were excluded. Our results show the important role of benthic generalist predators in limiting the establishment and spread of non-native species on anthropogenic structures. Further, this study highlights the unprecedented role of shrimp grazing in structuring hard-bottom communities. © Inter-Research 2011.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/140934
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.361
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.554
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Fondecyt3030007
Programa Bicentenario de Ciencia y Tecnologia
Funding Information:

Financial support for this study was provided by Fulbright to L. G. H. a Fondecyt 3030007 grant to C. F. G. and a Programa Bicentenario de Ciencia y Tecnologia grant to CEAZA. We thank J. Barrios, who helped with diving activities, and M. Thiel and 3 reviewers for providing critical comments on this manuscript.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDumont, CPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHarris, LGen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGaymer, CFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:22:04Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:22:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMarine Ecology Progress Series, 2011, v. 427, p. 95-103en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0171-8630en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/140934-
dc.description.abstractAnthropogenic structures may play an important role in the marine invasion process by providing novel artificial habitats, often out of the reach of common benthic predators. A survey of piers in northern-central Chile revealed a change in the epibenthic assemblage on pilings at different distances from a rocky shore with abundant grazers and predators. Pilings on soft sediment, away from the rocky shore, were heavily colonized by the invasive bryozoan Bugula neritina. We therefore hypothesized that benthic predators may forage on pilings located on rocky bottom whereas pilings on soft sediment benefit from the absence of generalist benthic predators which do not occur on soft sediment. We examined piling communities using cages directly attached to pilings, where we included or excluded the sea urchin Tetrapygus niger and the rock shrimp Rhyncocinetes typus. Resultant communities differed substantially; a high percentage of bare space occurred in the presence of sea urchins, while turf algae dominated in the presence of shrimp. Both sea urchins and shrimp suppressed the colonization of the invasive B. neritina and, when acting together, totally prevented its recruitment. In contrast, invasive bryozoans colonized 95% of the available substratum in cages where predators were excluded. Our results show the important role of benthic generalist predators in limiting the establishment and spread of non-native species on anthropogenic structures. Further, this study highlights the unprecedented role of shrimp grazing in structuring hard-bottom communities. © Inter-Research 2011.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInter-Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.int-res.com/journals/meps/index.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMarine Ecology Progress Seriesen_HK
dc.rightsMarine Ecology - Progress Series. Copyright © Inter-Research.-
dc.subjectArtificial habitaten_HK
dc.subjectFoulingen_HK
dc.subjectInvasive speciesen_HK
dc.subjectPredationen_HK
dc.subjectRock shrimpen_HK
dc.subjectSea urchinen_HK
dc.titleAnthropogenic structures as a spatial refuge from predation for the invasive bryozoan bugula neritinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailDumont, CP: dumont.clement@gmail.comen_HK
dc.identifier.authorityDumont, CP=rp00692en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.3354/meps09040en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79954509171en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros195776en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79954509171&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume427en_HK
dc.identifier.spage95en_HK
dc.identifier.epage103en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000289489800008-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDumont, CP=13407874500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHarris, LG=7401537146en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGaymer, CF=35606753000en_HK

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