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Article: Does primary colonization or community structure determine the succession of fouling communities?

TitleDoes primary colonization or community structure determine the succession of fouling communities?
Authors
KeywordsCanalized succession
Competitive dominance
Fouling community
Primary colonization
Priority effects
Pyura chilensis
Species interactions
Succession
Issue Date2010
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jembe
Citation
Journal Of Experimental Marine Biology And Ecology, 2010, v. 395 n. 1-2, p. 10-20 How to Cite?
AbstractPredicting the relevance of initial colonization and subsequent species interactions for succession in marine sessile communities is difficult because the effects of both factors depend on highly variable environmental processes (e.g. currents, topography, upwelling and others). Depending on the successional stage at which a new species arrives, it can either rapidly colonize in large numbers or its colonization success might be suppressed by resident species. In order to assess the roles of (i) initial colonization and (ii) subsequent species interactions on community development, we examined the succession of fouling assemblages that established on artificial substrata during two different seasonal periods, i.e. austral winter/spring and spring/summer. At 16. weeks of age communities that were initiated in different seasons varied significantly in composition and diversity. During each period (winter/spring and spring/summer), multispecies fouling consortia of different ages (hereafter termed "old" and "young") were reciprocally transplanted between two neighbouring study sites and their succession was documented. After 8. weeks of transplantation communities of different ages maintained their differences in diversity even in the face of environmental change. However, during winter/spring the spreading of the dominant species P. chilensis caused more rapid convergence between all communities at both sites. During the spring/summer period, the high initial abundances of the weak competitor Bugula neritina led to the maintenance of differences between resident and transplanted assemblages within each site. Later colonizers, including the dominant competitor P. chilensis, however, could recruit onto B. neritina and started to spread in the communities. These results suggest that the early and intermediate succession of fouling communities in highly productive marine environments such as the Humboldt Current System is driven by the temporal and spatial variability of propagule supply, while the long-term stability of these communities depends on the identity of colonizers and their competitiveness. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/140929
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.796
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.029
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCifuentes, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorKrueger, Ien_HK
dc.contributor.authorDumont, CPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLenz, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorThiel, Men_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:21:31Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:21:31Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Experimental Marine Biology And Ecology, 2010, v. 395 n. 1-2, p. 10-20en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-0981en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/140929-
dc.description.abstractPredicting the relevance of initial colonization and subsequent species interactions for succession in marine sessile communities is difficult because the effects of both factors depend on highly variable environmental processes (e.g. currents, topography, upwelling and others). Depending on the successional stage at which a new species arrives, it can either rapidly colonize in large numbers or its colonization success might be suppressed by resident species. In order to assess the roles of (i) initial colonization and (ii) subsequent species interactions on community development, we examined the succession of fouling assemblages that established on artificial substrata during two different seasonal periods, i.e. austral winter/spring and spring/summer. At 16. weeks of age communities that were initiated in different seasons varied significantly in composition and diversity. During each period (winter/spring and spring/summer), multispecies fouling consortia of different ages (hereafter termed "old" and "young") were reciprocally transplanted between two neighbouring study sites and their succession was documented. After 8. weeks of transplantation communities of different ages maintained their differences in diversity even in the face of environmental change. However, during winter/spring the spreading of the dominant species P. chilensis caused more rapid convergence between all communities at both sites. During the spring/summer period, the high initial abundances of the weak competitor Bugula neritina led to the maintenance of differences between resident and transplanted assemblages within each site. Later colonizers, including the dominant competitor P. chilensis, however, could recruit onto B. neritina and started to spread in the communities. These results suggest that the early and intermediate succession of fouling communities in highly productive marine environments such as the Humboldt Current System is driven by the temporal and spatial variability of propagule supply, while the long-term stability of these communities depends on the identity of colonizers and their competitiveness. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jembeen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecologyen_HK
dc.subjectCanalized successionen_HK
dc.subjectCompetitive dominanceen_HK
dc.subjectFouling communityen_HK
dc.subjectPrimary colonizationen_HK
dc.subjectPriority effectsen_HK
dc.subjectPyura chilensisen_HK
dc.subjectSpecies interactionsen_HK
dc.subjectSuccessionen_HK
dc.titleDoes primary colonization or community structure determine the succession of fouling communities?en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailDumont, CP: dumont.clement@gmail.comen_HK
dc.identifier.authorityDumont, CP=rp00692en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jembe.2010.08.019en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77957904127en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros195677en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77957904127&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume395en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1-2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage10en_HK
dc.identifier.epage20en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000284513500002-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCifuentes, M=22940336500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKrueger, I=36660728500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDumont, CP=13407874500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLenz, M=7101846929en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThiel, M=35231340100en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7925957-

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