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Article: Prospects for sustaining freshwater biodiversity in the 21st century: Linking ecosystem structure and function

TitleProspects for sustaining freshwater biodiversity in the 21st century: Linking ecosystem structure and function
Authors
KeywordsBiodiversity
Climate change
Conservation management
Ecosystem function
Environmental restoration
Issue Date2010
PublisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/718675/description#description
Citation
Current Opinion In Environmental Sustainability, 2010, v. 2 n. 5-6, p. 422-430 How to Cite?
AbstractBiodiversity in freshwater ecosystems is under grave threat from human activities, due to the combined effects of multiple stressors such as pollution and habitat degradation, flow regulation, overfishing, and alien species. Consequently, a higher proportion of freshwater species are threatened to extinction than their terrestrial or marine counterparts. While this indicates the degree to which current practices are unsustainable, the actual situation is even worse as a failure to take account of shifting baselines has led to underestimation of historic declines. Anthropocene trajectories of rising human population growth and water consumption will be exacerbated by climate change impacts and consequential environmental alterations which, in combination with existing stressors, will lead to further extinctions. Such losses seem likely to impair ecosystem functioning and hence provision of goods and services that underpin human livelihoods. Unfortunately, evidence of a close relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning (B-EF) is insufficient or equivocal at present, and B-EF science is not sufficiently mature to allow detailed predictions of precise outcomes of biodiversity loss or management needs for fresh waters. In the face of such uncertainty, it would be prudent to adopt the precautionary principle and minimize further losses. Despite the need for additional B-EF research and more effective communication of the importance and value of freshwater biodiversity, it is imperative that scientists and stakeholders collaborate to apply existing, albeit incomplete, knowledge to mitigating impacts and implementing conservation, management and restoration strategies in an adaptive fashion. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/140918
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.658
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.374
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDudgeon, Den_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:21:25Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:21:25Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationCurrent Opinion In Environmental Sustainability, 2010, v. 2 n. 5-6, p. 422-430en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1877-3435en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/140918-
dc.description.abstractBiodiversity in freshwater ecosystems is under grave threat from human activities, due to the combined effects of multiple stressors such as pollution and habitat degradation, flow regulation, overfishing, and alien species. Consequently, a higher proportion of freshwater species are threatened to extinction than their terrestrial or marine counterparts. While this indicates the degree to which current practices are unsustainable, the actual situation is even worse as a failure to take account of shifting baselines has led to underestimation of historic declines. Anthropocene trajectories of rising human population growth and water consumption will be exacerbated by climate change impacts and consequential environmental alterations which, in combination with existing stressors, will lead to further extinctions. Such losses seem likely to impair ecosystem functioning and hence provision of goods and services that underpin human livelihoods. Unfortunately, evidence of a close relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning (B-EF) is insufficient or equivocal at present, and B-EF science is not sufficiently mature to allow detailed predictions of precise outcomes of biodiversity loss or management needs for fresh waters. In the face of such uncertainty, it would be prudent to adopt the precautionary principle and minimize further losses. Despite the need for additional B-EF research and more effective communication of the importance and value of freshwater biodiversity, it is imperative that scientists and stakeholders collaborate to apply existing, albeit incomplete, knowledge to mitigating impacts and implementing conservation, management and restoration strategies in an adaptive fashion. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/718675/description#descriptionen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofCurrent Opinion in Environmental Sustainabilityen_HK
dc.subjectBiodiversity-
dc.subjectClimate change-
dc.subjectConservation management-
dc.subjectEcosystem function-
dc.subjectEnvironmental restoration-
dc.titleProspects for sustaining freshwater biodiversity in the 21st century: Linking ecosystem structure and functionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailDudgeon, D: ddudgeon@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityDudgeon, D=rp00691en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cosust.2010.09.001en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78649902551en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros194860en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78649902551&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume2en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5-6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage422en_HK
dc.identifier.epage430en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000286088700014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDudgeon, D=7006559840en_HK

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