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Article: Microbial communities involved in anaerobic degradation of alkanes
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TitleMicrobial communities involved in anaerobic degradation of alkanes
 
AuthorsMbadinga, SM2
Wang, LY2
Zhou, L2
Liu, JF2
Gu, JD1
Mu, BZ2
 
KeywordsAlkanes
Alkylsuccinate synthase
Alkylsuccinates
Anaerobic degradation
Methanogenic degradation of alkanes
Microbial communities
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ibiod
 
CitationInternational Biodeterioration And Biodegradation, 2011, v. 65 n. 1, p. 1-13 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ibiod.2010.11.009
 
AbstractSaturated hydrocarbons are quantitatively the most abundant fraction among all petroleum hydrocarbons. Significant advances have been made in the understanding of the anaerobic biodegradability of alkanes in terms of the microorganisms involved and the biochemical pathways over the past two decades. They can be used as carbon and energy sources by diverse physiological groups of microorganisms (isolates or consortia) grown under chlorate-reducing, nitrate-reducing, sufidogenic or methanogenic conditions. Two general biochemical mechanisms have been proposed for the initial activation of alkanes including addition of fumarate and carboxylation. However, glycyl radical enzymes dependent fumarate addition which yields alkyl-substituted succinate appear to be the most commonly shared mechanism for the anaerobic attack of alkanes under various redox conditions by phylogenetically diverse microorganisms. The genes encoding the candidate alkylsuccinate synthase have been recently described in alkane-degrading sulfate- and nitrate-reducers as well as in hydrocarbon-rich environments. Alternative mechanisms may also be available depending on the alkane-degrading microbial community and electron acceptors utilized. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.
 
ISSN0964-8305
2013 Impact Factor: 2.235
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.884
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ibiod.2010.11.009
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000286847000001
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Natural Science Foundation of China41073055
863 Program2009AA063503
Funding Information:

This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41073055) and the 863 Program (Grant No. 2009AA063503).

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorMbadinga, SM
 
dc.contributor.authorWang, LY
 
dc.contributor.authorZhou, L
 
dc.contributor.authorLiu, JF
 
dc.contributor.authorGu, JD
 
dc.contributor.authorMu, BZ
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:21:18Z
 
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:21:18Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractSaturated hydrocarbons are quantitatively the most abundant fraction among all petroleum hydrocarbons. Significant advances have been made in the understanding of the anaerobic biodegradability of alkanes in terms of the microorganisms involved and the biochemical pathways over the past two decades. They can be used as carbon and energy sources by diverse physiological groups of microorganisms (isolates or consortia) grown under chlorate-reducing, nitrate-reducing, sufidogenic or methanogenic conditions. Two general biochemical mechanisms have been proposed for the initial activation of alkanes including addition of fumarate and carboxylation. However, glycyl radical enzymes dependent fumarate addition which yields alkyl-substituted succinate appear to be the most commonly shared mechanism for the anaerobic attack of alkanes under various redox conditions by phylogenetically diverse microorganisms. The genes encoding the candidate alkylsuccinate synthase have been recently described in alkane-degrading sulfate- and nitrate-reducers as well as in hydrocarbon-rich environments. Alternative mechanisms may also be available depending on the alkane-degrading microbial community and electron acceptors utilized. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationInternational Biodeterioration And Biodegradation, 2011, v. 65 n. 1, p. 1-13 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ibiod.2010.11.009
 
dc.identifier.citeulike8409984
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ibiod.2010.11.009
 
dc.identifier.epage13
 
dc.identifier.hkuros194844
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000286847000001
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Natural Science Foundation of China41073055
863 Program2009AA063503
Funding Information:

This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41073055) and the 863 Program (Grant No. 2009AA063503).

 
dc.identifier.issn0964-8305
2013 Impact Factor: 2.235
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.884
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78650677445
 
dc.identifier.spage1
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/140909
 
dc.identifier.volume65
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ibiod
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Biodeterioration and Biodegradation
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectAlkanes
 
dc.subjectAlkylsuccinate synthase
 
dc.subjectAlkylsuccinates
 
dc.subjectAnaerobic degradation
 
dc.subjectMethanogenic degradation of alkanes
 
dc.subjectMicrobial communities
 
dc.titleMicrobial communities involved in anaerobic degradation of alkanes
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. East China University of Science and Technology