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Article: Responses of aerobic and anaerobic ammonia/ammonium-oxidizing microorganisms to anthropogenic pollution in coastal marine environments

TitleResponses of aerobic and anaerobic ammonia/ammonium-oxidizing microorganisms to anthropogenic pollution in coastal marine environments
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/bookseries/00766879
Citation
Methods In Enzymology, 2011, v. 496, p. 35-62 How to Cite?
AbstractUp to date, numerous studies have shown that the community structure of aerobic ammonia oxidizers including ammonia-oxidizing Betaproteobacteria (Beta-AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and, more recently, the anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria is responsive to environmental conditions including salinity, pH, selected metal ions, concentrations of inorganic nitrogen, total phosphorus, the ratio of organic carbon and nitrogen, and sedimentological factors such as the sediment median grain size. Identification of these responses to known anthropogenic pollution is of particular interest to better understand the growth dynamics and activities of nitrogen transforming microorganisms in marine environments. This chapter discusses currently available methods including molecular ecological analysis using clone library constructions with specific molecular genetic markers for delineating community changes of Beta-AOB, AOA, and anammox bacteria. Using data on ammonia-oxidizing microbial community structures from Jiaozhou Bay in North China and three marine environments with anthropogenic pollution gradients in South China from coastal Mai Po Nature Reserve of Hong Kong to the South China Sea as examples, statistical analyses packages (DOTUR, UniFrac, and Canoco) are presented as useful tools to illustrate the relationship between changes in nitrogen metabolizing microbial communities and established environmental variables. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/140903
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 2.088
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.501
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCao, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorDang, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGu, JDen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:21:16Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:21:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMethods In Enzymology, 2011, v. 496, p. 35-62en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0076-6879en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/140903-
dc.description.abstractUp to date, numerous studies have shown that the community structure of aerobic ammonia oxidizers including ammonia-oxidizing Betaproteobacteria (Beta-AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and, more recently, the anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria is responsive to environmental conditions including salinity, pH, selected metal ions, concentrations of inorganic nitrogen, total phosphorus, the ratio of organic carbon and nitrogen, and sedimentological factors such as the sediment median grain size. Identification of these responses to known anthropogenic pollution is of particular interest to better understand the growth dynamics and activities of nitrogen transforming microorganisms in marine environments. This chapter discusses currently available methods including molecular ecological analysis using clone library constructions with specific molecular genetic markers for delineating community changes of Beta-AOB, AOA, and anammox bacteria. Using data on ammonia-oxidizing microbial community structures from Jiaozhou Bay in North China and three marine environments with anthropogenic pollution gradients in South China from coastal Mai Po Nature Reserve of Hong Kong to the South China Sea as examples, statistical analyses packages (DOTUR, UniFrac, and Canoco) are presented as useful tools to illustrate the relationship between changes in nitrogen metabolizing microbial communities and established environmental variables. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/bookseries/00766879en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMethods in Enzymologyen_HK
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in <Journal title>. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in PUBLICATION, [VOL#, ISSUE#, (DATE)] DOI#en_US
dc.titleResponses of aerobic and anaerobic ammonia/ammonium-oxidizing microorganisms to anthropogenic pollution in coastal marine environmentsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailGu, JD: jdgu@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityGu, JD=rp00701en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/B978-0-12-386489-5.00002-6en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21514459-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79955487255en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros194836en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79955487255&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume496en_HK
dc.identifier.spage35en_HK
dc.identifier.epage62en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000290776300002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCao, H=37018049400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, M=35210975800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDang, H=23134477000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGu, JD=7403129601en_HK

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