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Article: Spatial distribution of ciguateric fish in the Republic of Kiribati
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TitleSpatial distribution of ciguateric fish in the Republic of Kiribati
 
AuthorsChan, WH2
Mak, YL2
Wu, JJ2
Jin, L2
Sit, WH1
Lam, JCW2
Sadovy de Mitcheson, Y1
Chan, LL2
Lam, PKS2
Murphy, MB2
 
KeywordsCiguatera
Coral reef fish
Moray eel
Mouse neuroblastoma assay
Republic of Kiribati
Spatial distribution
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chemosphere
 
CitationChemosphere, 2011, v. 84 n. 1, p. 117-123 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2011.02.036
 
AbstractCiguatera is food poisoning caused by human consumption of reef fish contaminated with ciguatoxins (CTXs). The expanding international trade of tropical fish species from ciguatera-endemic regions has resulted in increased global incidence of ciguatera, and more than 50000 people are estimated to suffer from ciguatera each year worldwide. The Republic of Kiribati is located in the Pacific Ocean; two of its islands, Marakei and Tarawa, have been suggested as high-risk areas for ciguatera. The toxicities of coral reef fish collected from these islands, including herbivorous, omnivorous and carnivorous fish (24% [n=41], 8% [n=13] and 68% [n=117], respectively), were analyzed using the mouse neuroblastoma assay (MNA) after CTX extraction. The MNA results indicated that 156 fish specimens, or 91% of the fish samples, were ciguatoxic (CTX levels >0.01ngg -1). Groupers and moray eels were generally more toxic by an order of magnitude than other fish species. All of the collected individuals of eight species (n=3-19) were toxic. Toxicity varied within species and among locations by up to 10000-fold. Cephalapholis argus and Gymnothorax spp. collected from Tarawa Island were significantly less toxic than those from Marakei Island, although all individuals were toxic based on the 0.01ngg -1 threshold. CTX concentrations in the livers of individuals of two moray eel species (Gymnothorax spp., n=6) were nine times greater than those in muscle, and toxicity in liver and muscle showed a strong positive correlation with body weight. The present study provides quantitative information on the ciguatoxicity and distribution of toxicity in fish for use in fisheries management and public health. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.
 
ISSN0045-6535
2013 Impact Factor: 3.499
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.746
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2011.02.036
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000292416400016
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, ChinaU3/CRF/08
State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science (Xiamen University)MEL0607
University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

We thank Mr. Being Yeeting (Senior Fisheries Scientist, Secretariat of the Pacific Community, New Caledonia) and the Fisheries Division (Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resource Development, Republic of Kiribati) for facilitating the sample collection. We thank Ms. Rachel P.P. Wong for identification of fish species and Mr. Albert C.C. Au, Mr. Xiwen Jiang, Mr. Minghua Wang and Mr. Yue Gao (School of Biological Science, The University of Hong Kong) for technical assistance. The work described in this paper was supported by grants from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (City U3/CRF/08), State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science (Xiamen University) cooperative Project (MEL0607) and a Science Faculty Collaborative Seed Grant from the University of Hong Kong.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorChan, WH
 
dc.contributor.authorMak, YL
 
dc.contributor.authorWu, JJ
 
dc.contributor.authorJin, L
 
dc.contributor.authorSit, WH
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, JCW
 
dc.contributor.authorSadovy de Mitcheson, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, LL
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, PKS
 
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, MB
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:21:13Z
 
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:21:13Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractCiguatera is food poisoning caused by human consumption of reef fish contaminated with ciguatoxins (CTXs). The expanding international trade of tropical fish species from ciguatera-endemic regions has resulted in increased global incidence of ciguatera, and more than 50000 people are estimated to suffer from ciguatera each year worldwide. The Republic of Kiribati is located in the Pacific Ocean; two of its islands, Marakei and Tarawa, have been suggested as high-risk areas for ciguatera. The toxicities of coral reef fish collected from these islands, including herbivorous, omnivorous and carnivorous fish (24% [n=41], 8% [n=13] and 68% [n=117], respectively), were analyzed using the mouse neuroblastoma assay (MNA) after CTX extraction. The MNA results indicated that 156 fish specimens, or 91% of the fish samples, were ciguatoxic (CTX levels >0.01ngg -1). Groupers and moray eels were generally more toxic by an order of magnitude than other fish species. All of the collected individuals of eight species (n=3-19) were toxic. Toxicity varied within species and among locations by up to 10000-fold. Cephalapholis argus and Gymnothorax spp. collected from Tarawa Island were significantly less toxic than those from Marakei Island, although all individuals were toxic based on the 0.01ngg -1 threshold. CTX concentrations in the livers of individuals of two moray eel species (Gymnothorax spp., n=6) were nine times greater than those in muscle, and toxicity in liver and muscle showed a strong positive correlation with body weight. The present study provides quantitative information on the ciguatoxicity and distribution of toxicity in fish for use in fisheries management and public health. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationChemosphere, 2011, v. 84 n. 1, p. 117-123 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2011.02.036
 
dc.identifier.citeulike9075952
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2011.02.036
 
dc.identifier.epage123
 
dc.identifier.hkuros194710
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000292416400016
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, ChinaU3/CRF/08
State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science (Xiamen University)MEL0607
University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

We thank Mr. Being Yeeting (Senior Fisheries Scientist, Secretariat of the Pacific Community, New Caledonia) and the Fisheries Division (Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resource Development, Republic of Kiribati) for facilitating the sample collection. We thank Ms. Rachel P.P. Wong for identification of fish species and Mr. Albert C.C. Au, Mr. Xiwen Jiang, Mr. Minghua Wang and Mr. Yue Gao (School of Biological Science, The University of Hong Kong) for technical assistance. The work described in this paper was supported by grants from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (City U3/CRF/08), State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science (Xiamen University) cooperative Project (MEL0607) and a Science Faculty Collaborative Seed Grant from the University of Hong Kong.

 
dc.identifier.issn0045-6535
2013 Impact Factor: 3.499
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.746
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.pmid21397295
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79956124760
 
dc.identifier.spage117
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/140897
 
dc.identifier.volume84
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chemosphere
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofChemosphere
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshCiguatera Poisoning - epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshCiguatoxins - metabolism - toxicity
 
dc.subject.meshFishes - metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshLiver - drug effects - metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshPoisons - metabolism - toxicity
 
dc.subjectCiguatera
 
dc.subjectCoral reef fish
 
dc.subjectMoray eel
 
dc.subjectMouse neuroblastoma assay
 
dc.subjectRepublic of Kiribati
 
dc.subjectSpatial distribution
 
dc.titleSpatial distribution of ciguateric fish in the Republic of Kiribati
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Lam, JCW</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Sadovy de Mitcheson, Y</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. City University of Hong Kong