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Article: The sharks of South East Asia - unknown, unmonitored and unmanaged

TitleThe sharks of South East Asia - unknown, unmonitored and unmanaged
Authors
KeywordsAnecdotes
Conservation
Fish market
Juvenile fish
Sharks
Threatened fish
Traditional knowledge
Issue Date2011
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/FAF
Citation
Fish And Fisheries, 2011, v. 12 n. 1, p. 51-74 How to Cite?
AbstractSharks fisheries have declined globally due to over- and unregulated fishing. As with many collapsed and unmonitored coastal fisheries, information is difficult to obtain, yet it is important to understand the historical changes determining population trends and evaluate the current status of sharks in order to conserve these vulnerable species. Here, we document for the first time the history and general condition of the shark fisheries of Southern China, specifically Hong Kong, and Guangdong, Fujian and Hainan Provinces. This study shows, through the use of historical literature and anecdotal accounts, including fisher interviews, that all known shark fisheries in the region collapsed between the 1970s and the 1990s. Of the 109 species present historically in the South China Sea, only 18 species were recorded in current market surveys, of which all were landed as bycatch and 65% were below the size of sexual maturity. Markets are dominated by smaller species, including the spadenose shark (Scoliodon laticaudus) and the whitespotted bambooshark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum). Marketed large shark species are almost all below the size of sexual maturation, evidence of growth overfishing and a factor in recruitment overfishing. Some species, like the whale (Rhincodon typus) and basking sharks (Cetorhinus maximus), are clearly vulnerable to local extinction without intervention. Given the inherent vulnerability of sharks and the overfished states of many sharks, there is clearly an urgent need to formulate impacting conservation and management plans for these rapidly declining species in a region that has the highest demand for shark products globally. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/140894
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.521
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.751
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Division of Ecology Biodiversity
University of Hong Kong
Ocean Park Conservation Foundation Hong Kong
Funding Information:

We are most grateful to Liu Min, William White, David Dudgeon for help and comments on the work. Special thanks to the Aberdeen Fish Marketing Organization (Hong Kong), Fisheries Bureau of the People's Republic of China and the South China Sea Fisheries Institute for providing information. A big thanks to all the interviewees and fishers for their time and wonderful stories. This paper forms part of the Mphil research of the first author and was supported by studentship provided by the Division of Ecology & Biodiversity, and research funding from the Committee on Research and Conference Grants, The University of Hong Kong. Study trips to mainland China were partially sponsored by the Ocean Park Conservation Foundation Hong Kong.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, VYYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSadovy De Mitcheson, Yen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:21:01Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:21:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationFish And Fisheries, 2011, v. 12 n. 1, p. 51-74en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1467-2960en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/140894-
dc.description.abstractSharks fisheries have declined globally due to over- and unregulated fishing. As with many collapsed and unmonitored coastal fisheries, information is difficult to obtain, yet it is important to understand the historical changes determining population trends and evaluate the current status of sharks in order to conserve these vulnerable species. Here, we document for the first time the history and general condition of the shark fisheries of Southern China, specifically Hong Kong, and Guangdong, Fujian and Hainan Provinces. This study shows, through the use of historical literature and anecdotal accounts, including fisher interviews, that all known shark fisheries in the region collapsed between the 1970s and the 1990s. Of the 109 species present historically in the South China Sea, only 18 species were recorded in current market surveys, of which all were landed as bycatch and 65% were below the size of sexual maturity. Markets are dominated by smaller species, including the spadenose shark (Scoliodon laticaudus) and the whitespotted bambooshark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum). Marketed large shark species are almost all below the size of sexual maturation, evidence of growth overfishing and a factor in recruitment overfishing. Some species, like the whale (Rhincodon typus) and basking sharks (Cetorhinus maximus), are clearly vulnerable to local extinction without intervention. Given the inherent vulnerability of sharks and the overfished states of many sharks, there is clearly an urgent need to formulate impacting conservation and management plans for these rapidly declining species in a region that has the highest demand for shark products globally. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/FAFen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofFish and Fisheriesen_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.subjectAnecdotesen_HK
dc.subjectConservationen_HK
dc.subjectFish marketen_HK
dc.subjectJuvenile fishen_HK
dc.subjectSharksen_HK
dc.subjectThreatened fishen_HK
dc.subjectTraditional knowledgeen_HK
dc.titleThe sharks of South East Asia - unknown, unmonitored and unmanageden_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSadovy De Mitcheson, Y: yjsadovy@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySadovy De Mitcheson, Y=rp00773en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-2979.2010.00383.xen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79951528366en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros194706en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79951528366&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume12en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage51en_HK
dc.identifier.epage74en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000287361200004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, VYY=36968889000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSadovy De Mitcheson, Y=6603830002en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7899522-

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