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Article: Polarity proteins and actin regulatory proteins are unlikely partners that regulate cell adhesion in the seminiferous epithelium during spermatogenesis

TitlePolarity proteins and actin regulatory proteins are unlikely partners that regulate cell adhesion in the seminiferous epithelium during spermatogenesis
Authors
KeywordsActin regulators
Anchoring junction
Arp3
Cdc42
Ectoplasmic specialization
Eps8
GTPase
PAR6
Polarity proteins
Seminiferous epithelial cycle
Testis
Issue Date2011
PublisherHistology and Histopathology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hh.um.es
Citation
Histology And Histopathology, 2011, v. 26 n. 11, p. 1465-1474 How to Cite?
AbstractIn mammalian testis, spermatogenesis takes place in the seminiferous epithelium of the seminiferous tubule, which is composed of a series of cellular events. These include: (i) spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) renewal via mitosis and differentiation of SSC to spermatogenia, (ii) meiosis, (iii) spermiogenesis, and (iv) spermiation. Throughout these events, developing germ cells remain adhered to the Sertoli cell in the seminiferous epithelium amidst extensive cellular, biochemical, molecular and morphological changes to obtain structural support and nourishment. These events are coordinated via signal transduction at the cell-cell interface through cell junctions, illustrating the significance of cell junctions and adhesion in spermatogenesis. Additionally, developing germ cells migrate progressively across the seminiferous epithelium from the stem cell niche, which is located in the basal compartment near the basement membrane of the tunica propria adjacent to the interstitium. Recent studies have shown that some apparently unrelated proteins, such as polarity proteins and actin regulatory proteins, are in fact working in concert and synergistically to coordinate the continuous cyclic changes of adhesion at the Sertoli- Sertoli and Sertoli-germ cell interface in the seminiferous epithelium during the epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis, such that developing germ cells remain attached to the Sertoli cell in the epithelium while they alter in cell shape and migrate across the epithelium. In this review, we highlight the physiological significance of endocytic vesicle-mediated protein trafficking events under the influence of polarity and actin regulatory proteins in conferring cyclic events of cell adhesion and de-adhesion. Furthermore, these recent findings have unraveled some unexpected molecules to be targeted for male contraceptive development, which are also targets of toxicant-induced male reproductive dysfunction.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/140886
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.875
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.805
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYan Cheng, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, EWPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLie, PPYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMruk, DDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorXiao, Xen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, MWMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLui, WYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, WMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:20:56Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:20:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHistology And Histopathology, 2011, v. 26 n. 11, p. 1465-1474en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0213-3911en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/140886-
dc.description.abstractIn mammalian testis, spermatogenesis takes place in the seminiferous epithelium of the seminiferous tubule, which is composed of a series of cellular events. These include: (i) spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) renewal via mitosis and differentiation of SSC to spermatogenia, (ii) meiosis, (iii) spermiogenesis, and (iv) spermiation. Throughout these events, developing germ cells remain adhered to the Sertoli cell in the seminiferous epithelium amidst extensive cellular, biochemical, molecular and morphological changes to obtain structural support and nourishment. These events are coordinated via signal transduction at the cell-cell interface through cell junctions, illustrating the significance of cell junctions and adhesion in spermatogenesis. Additionally, developing germ cells migrate progressively across the seminiferous epithelium from the stem cell niche, which is located in the basal compartment near the basement membrane of the tunica propria adjacent to the interstitium. Recent studies have shown that some apparently unrelated proteins, such as polarity proteins and actin regulatory proteins, are in fact working in concert and synergistically to coordinate the continuous cyclic changes of adhesion at the Sertoli- Sertoli and Sertoli-germ cell interface in the seminiferous epithelium during the epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis, such that developing germ cells remain attached to the Sertoli cell in the epithelium while they alter in cell shape and migrate across the epithelium. In this review, we highlight the physiological significance of endocytic vesicle-mediated protein trafficking events under the influence of polarity and actin regulatory proteins in conferring cyclic events of cell adhesion and de-adhesion. Furthermore, these recent findings have unraveled some unexpected molecules to be targeted for male contraceptive development, which are also targets of toxicant-induced male reproductive dysfunction.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHistology and Histopathology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hh.um.esen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHistology and Histopathologyen_HK
dc.subjectActin regulatorsen_HK
dc.subjectAnchoring junctionen_HK
dc.subjectArp3en_HK
dc.subjectCdc42en_HK
dc.subjectEctoplasmic specializationen_HK
dc.subjectEps8en_HK
dc.subjectGTPaseen_HK
dc.subjectPAR6en_HK
dc.subjectPolarity proteinsen_HK
dc.subjectSeminiferous epithelial cycleen_HK
dc.subjectTestisen_HK
dc.titlePolarity proteins and actin regulatory proteins are unlikely partners that regulate cell adhesion in the seminiferous epithelium during spermatogenesisen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLui, WY: wylui@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, WM: hrszlwm@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLui, WY=rp00756en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, WM=rp00728en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid21938683-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80053211264en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros193949en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80053211264&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume26en_HK
dc.identifier.issue11en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1465en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1474en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000295123900011-
dc.publisher.placeSpainen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYan Cheng, C=6602806090en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, EWP=23029194700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLie, PPY=15839862700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMruk, DD=6701823934en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXiao, X=40361736200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, MWM=53264137300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLui, WY=35220192400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, WM=24799156600en_HK

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