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Article: Bioaccumulation and maternal transfer of PBDE 47 in the marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma) following dietary exposure
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TitleBioaccumulation and maternal transfer of PBDE 47 in the marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma) following dietary exposure
 
Authorsvan de Merwe, JP2 3
Chan, AKY1
Lei, ENY2
Yau, MS2
Lam, MHW2
Wu, RSS1
 
KeywordsBioaccumulation
Flame retardants
Maternal transfer
Oryzias melastigma
PBDEs
Toxicokinetics
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/aquatox
 
CitationAquatic Toxicology, 2011, v. 103 n. 3-4, p. 199-204 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aquatox.2011.02.021
 
AbstractThe bioaccumulation and maternal transfer of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (PBDE 47) were investigated in the marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma) following dietary exposure, in which PBDE 47 was bioencapsulated into brine shrimp (Artemia sp.) and fed daily to male-female pairs of medaka. In the accumulation experiment, each 2-month-old (pre-breeding) medaka were provided with dietary PBDE 47 at 1.3±0.2μg/day for 21days. Growth-corrected concentrations of PBDE 47 in the medaka increased over the 21days of exposure and there were no significant differences between males and females at any of the sampling times. Final concentrations were similar for males and females after 21days (230±30 and 250±30μgg -1 wet weight, respectively), accounting for 84-100% of the PBDE 47 provided in the diet. In the maternal transfer experiment, 3-month-old (breeding) medaka were provided with dietary PBDE 47 at 1.2±0.2μg/day for 18days, and reached body concentrations of 76±3 (males) and 61±6 (females)μgg -1 wet weight. Female growth-corrected PBDE 47 concentrations were significantly lower than males by day 12 (P<0.05), and egg PBDE 47 concentrations were up to 25ng/egg by day 18. Our results showed that maternal transfer is an important offloading mechanism for female fish. The fact that lipid normalized egg:female PBDE ratios did not significantly deviate from 1 further indicated that the maternal transfer of PBDE 47 is associated with lipid mobilization during egg production. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.
 
ISSN0166-445X
2012 Impact Factor: 3.73
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.615
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aquatox.2011.02.021
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000291908100008
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University Grants Committee of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, ChinaAoE/P-04/04
Funding Information:

The work described in this paper was fully supported by a grant from the University Grants Committee of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (AoE/P-04/04). Thanks are due to Jerry Wong for technical assistance.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorvan de Merwe, JP
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, AKY
 
dc.contributor.authorLei, ENY
 
dc.contributor.authorYau, MS
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, MHW
 
dc.contributor.authorWu, RSS
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:20:51Z
 
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:20:51Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractThe bioaccumulation and maternal transfer of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (PBDE 47) were investigated in the marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma) following dietary exposure, in which PBDE 47 was bioencapsulated into brine shrimp (Artemia sp.) and fed daily to male-female pairs of medaka. In the accumulation experiment, each 2-month-old (pre-breeding) medaka were provided with dietary PBDE 47 at 1.3±0.2μg/day for 21days. Growth-corrected concentrations of PBDE 47 in the medaka increased over the 21days of exposure and there were no significant differences between males and females at any of the sampling times. Final concentrations were similar for males and females after 21days (230±30 and 250±30μgg -1 wet weight, respectively), accounting for 84-100% of the PBDE 47 provided in the diet. In the maternal transfer experiment, 3-month-old (breeding) medaka were provided with dietary PBDE 47 at 1.2±0.2μg/day for 18days, and reached body concentrations of 76±3 (males) and 61±6 (females)μgg -1 wet weight. Female growth-corrected PBDE 47 concentrations were significantly lower than males by day 12 (P<0.05), and egg PBDE 47 concentrations were up to 25ng/egg by day 18. Our results showed that maternal transfer is an important offloading mechanism for female fish. The fact that lipid normalized egg:female PBDE ratios did not significantly deviate from 1 further indicated that the maternal transfer of PBDE 47 is associated with lipid mobilization during egg production. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationAquatic Toxicology, 2011, v. 103 n. 3-4, p. 199-204 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aquatox.2011.02.021
 
dc.identifier.citeulike8961314
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aquatox.2011.02.021
 
dc.identifier.eissn1879-1514
 
dc.identifier.epage204
 
dc.identifier.hkuros192059
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000291908100008
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University Grants Committee of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, ChinaAoE/P-04/04
Funding Information:

The work described in this paper was fully supported by a grant from the University Grants Committee of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (AoE/P-04/04). Thanks are due to Jerry Wong for technical assistance.

 
dc.identifier.issn0166-445X
2012 Impact Factor: 3.73
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.615
 
dc.identifier.issue3-4
 
dc.identifier.pmid21481818
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79953689936
 
dc.identifier.spage199
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/140880
 
dc.identifier.volume103
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/aquatox
 
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands
 
dc.relation.ispartofAquatic Toxicology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshEmbryo, Nonmammalian - metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Exposure - adverse effects
 
dc.subject.meshHalogenated Diphenyl Ethers - metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshOryzias - embryology - metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshWater Pollutants, Chemical - metabolism
 
dc.subjectBioaccumulation
 
dc.subjectFlame retardants
 
dc.subjectMaternal transfer
 
dc.subjectOryzias melastigma
 
dc.subjectPBDEs
 
dc.subjectToxicokinetics
 
dc.titleBioaccumulation and maternal transfer of PBDE 47 in the marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma) following dietary exposure
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<description.abstract>The bioaccumulation and maternal transfer of 2,2&apos;,4,4&apos;-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (PBDE 47) were investigated in the marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma) following dietary exposure, in which PBDE 47 was bioencapsulated into brine shrimp (Artemia sp.) and fed daily to male-female pairs of medaka. In the accumulation experiment, each 2-month-old (pre-breeding) medaka were provided with dietary PBDE 47 at 1.3&#177;0.2&#956;g/day for 21days. Growth-corrected concentrations of PBDE 47 in the medaka increased over the 21days of exposure and there were no significant differences between males and females at any of the sampling times. Final concentrations were similar for males and females after 21days (230&#177;30 and 250&#177;30&#956;gg -1 wet weight, respectively), accounting for 84-100% of the PBDE 47 provided in the diet. In the maternal transfer experiment, 3-month-old (breeding) medaka were provided with dietary PBDE 47 at 1.2&#177;0.2&#956;g/day for 18days, and reached body concentrations of 76&#177;3 (males) and 61&#177;6 (females)&#956;gg -1 wet weight. Female growth-corrected PBDE 47 concentrations were significantly lower than males by day 12 (P&lt;0.05), and egg PBDE 47 concentrations were up to 25ng/egg by day 18. Our results showed that maternal transfer is an important offloading mechanism for female fish. The fact that lipid normalized egg:female PBDE ratios did not significantly deviate from 1 further indicated that the maternal transfer of PBDE 47 is associated with lipid mobilization during egg production. &#169; 2011 Elsevier B.V.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. City University of Hong Kong
  3. Griffith University